Announcing Paperback edition of David Austell’s Little Creek & Other Poems

creek poems paper back

Little Creek & Other Poems
David Austell
ISBN ISBN-81-8250-054-0 2014 Paper pp. 128 Rs.295

David B. Austell is Assistant Vice President and Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City, where he is also an Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School (adjunct). David has undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education. In 1992, David was a Fulbright grantee in Japan and Korea. The love of poetry grows from deep roots, and in David’s case from his parents: his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child.

To the Highest Heavens: Poetry of Heights: New York City, The Himalayas, and Mars–Yuyutsu Ram Dass Sharma & David B. Austell

prelude
creek poems paper back

To the Highest Heavens:
Poetry of Heights: New York City, The Himalayas, and Mars
Yuyutsu Ram Dass Sharma & David B. Austell


A poetry reading at New York University
during
International Education Week 2013

Yuyutsu Sharma returns to New York City to read from his new book entitled Nine New York Poems: A Prelude to A Blizzard in My Bones: New York Poems (Nirala 2014)
David Austell will read from the New Revised Paperback edition of his much discussed Little Creek and Other Poems (Nirala, 2014). David will also read from his ambitious forthcoming book, The Tin Man,
to be published by Nirala later in 2014.

Thursday, November 21, 2013
Office of Global Services
516 LaGuardia Place
New York University
6:00pm

Directions: The Office of Global Services (OGS) is located at 561 LaGuardia Place at the corner of West 3rd Street and LaGuardia Place in Greenwich Village, Manhattan. OGS is directly behind the NYU Bobst Library, and is very close to Washington Square (South). Signage for OGS is visible from LaGuardia Place. Please enter thought the front entrance on the first floor. The building OGS is located in is Washington Square Village Building 1.

New York University
70 Washington Square South, New York, New York 10012
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David B. Austell

David B. Austell is Assistant Vice President and Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City, where he is also an Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School (adjunct). David has undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education. In 1992, David was a Fulbright grantee in Japan and Korea. The love of poetry grows from deep roots, and in David’s case from his parents: his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child.

Yuyutsu RD Sharma

Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished poet and translator.

He has published nine poetry collections including, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New Poems, (Nirala, New Delhi 2012), Nepal Trilogy, Photographs and Poetry on Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang (www.Nepal-Trilogy.de, Epsilonmedia, Karlsruhe, 2010), a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, (2009, Indian reprint 2014) and Annapurna Poems, 2008), Reprint, 2012, 14).

Yuyutsu has also brought out a translation of Irish poet Cathal O’ Searcaigh poetry in Nepali in a bilingual collection entitled, Kathmandu: Poems, Selected and New (2006) and a translation of Hebrew poet Ronny Someck’s poetry in Nepali in a bilingual edition, Baghdad, February 1991 & Other Poems. He has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English and launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry.

Two books of his poetry, Poemes de l’ Himalayas (L’Harmattan, Paris) and Poemas de Los Himalayas (Cosmopoeticia, Cordoba, Spain) have appeared in French and Spanish respectively.

Widely traveled author, he has read his works at several prestigious places including The Poetry Café, London, The Seamus Heaney Center for Poetry, Belfast, New York University, New York, The Kring, Amsterdam, P.E.N, Paris, Knox College, Illinois, Whittier College, California, Baruch College, New York, WB Yeats’ Center, Sligo, Gustav Stressemann Institute, Bonn, Rubin Museum, New York, Irish Writers’ Centre, Dublin, The Guardian Newsroom, London, Trois Rivieres Poetry Festival, Quebec, Arnofini, Bristol, Borders, London, Slovenian Book Days, Ljubljana, Royal Society of Dramatic Arts, London, Gunter Grass House, Bremen, Nehru Center, London, March Hare, Newfoundland, Canada, South Bank Center, London, Gannon University, Erie, Frankfurt Book Fair, Frankfurt, Indian International Center, New Delhi, and Villa Serbelloni, Italy.

He has held workshops in creative writing and translation at Queen’s University, Belfast, University of Ottawa and South Asian Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany, University of California, Davis, Sacramento State University, California and New York University, New York.

Yuyutsu’s own work has been translated into German, French, Italian, Slovenian, Hebrew, Spanish and Dutch. He has also published his non-fiction, Annapurnas & Stains of Blood: Life, Travel and Writing a Page of Snow and edits Pratik, A Magazine of Contemporary Writing. He contributes literary columns to Nepal’s leading daily, The Himalayan Times.

Yuyutsu was at the Poetry Parnassus Festival organized to celebrate London Olympics 2012 where he represented Nepal and India. He will visit NYU later this year as Special Visiting Poet and in 2014, Nicaragua as Guest Poet to participate in International Poetry Festival of Granada.

Half the year, he travels and reads all over the world from his works and conducts creative writing workshop at various universities in North America and Europe but goes trekking in the Himalayas when back home.

Announcing Yuyutsu Sharma’s Nine New York Poems: A Prelude to A Blizzard in My Bones: New York Poems

prelude

‘Yuyutsu Sharma’s new collection is concerned with notions of home and being away in the exotic elsewhere. Home strikes deep, like ‘my grandma / asleep // on a plump / bubble // of a folk song’ but is then flung into the great proper nouns of New York, all detail, all observation and dazzle. The poems are registered at the tips of the eyes then connected with the sense of deep home. That is where the power lies. It emerges through ear and mouth as a kind of cosmopolitan love letter.’
George Szirtes, British Poet, winner of Faber Memorial Prize & T.S. Eliot Prize

‘Yuyutsu Sharma, a Himalayan poet who studied his craft in the United States and on the mule paths of high Himalayas has brought a visionary sensibility to his New York poems. They read like Federico Garcia Lorca having a Hindu dream, or like Allen Ginsberg risen from the dead and howling out a peyote vision for 2013. Their ambition, like Lorca’s in his Poet in New York or like Hart Crane’s in his New York epic, The Bridge, is to write an epic vision of the city–and ultimately of America–in linked lyrics. Here are the Twin Towers flaming like the red tongue of Kali, goddess of destruction, a city like a yellow-eyed demon, Hurricane Sandy burrowing into the island’s groin like a furious porcupine. Sharma is “a shaman…black bag bulging / from magical rainbows, / serpents from an Hindu Heaven, / skull of an abducted female Yeti,” and he casts spells in these strange, visionary, outrageous and magical poems.’
-Tony Barnstone, The Albert Upton Professor and Chair of English Whittier College, Author/Translator of Everyman’s Chinese Erotic Poems
A Blizzard in My Bones, Yuyu’s deeply moving new collection and a remarkable addition to modern urban literature. It is Nepal and Hinduism and Brooklyn and Manhattan and Greenwich Village drawn together in a new Space Cake: Amsterdam; but here the hallucinogen-stoked celebration is amid the concrete and steel heights of Metropolis.
-David Austell, Professor, NYU, author of Little Creek and Other Poems

If Langston Hughes, Federico García Lorca and Frank O’Hara were exhumed to rub their recollections of New York City together over dal and black tea, they might produce a manuscript as rapturous as Yuyutsu Sharma’s love letter to the five boroughs. Infused with the mythology of Sufi saints and Hindu deities, Blizzard Go Delhi is nonetheless utterly contemporary, juxtaposing Duane Reedes and Occupy Wall Streeters alongside Punjabi wheat fields and muscular Halwai-confectioners working over huge cauldrons of oil. Unrepentant in its sensuality, self-assured and visionary, Sharma’s book is an extravagant tour de force that shows us that stepping off the train into New York City is to enter a realm “of wandering winter spirits and wavering speeches…a bedlam vision of a bedroom utopia that tries very hard every night to find a partner of sleep.” Tries, but thankfully for us, fails and instead stays up to channel the manic, long-limbed energy of the city in this memorable and original verbal jazz solo. This book is a poetic triumph.
-Ravi Shankar, Executive Director of Drunken Boat, author of seven books/chapbooks of poetry & co-editor of W.W. Norton & Co.’s Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from Asia, the Middle East & Beyond

Capacious and wild, offering itself energetically to contrasting continents and sensibilities, Sharma’s ambitious and honest New York collection offers a vivid tribute to Lorca, its presiding muse.
-Annie Finch, winner of Robert Fitzgerald Award and author of Spells: New and Selected Poems

A Blizzard In My Bones is worth the wait. The marriage of eastern angst and western jitters is beautifully realized, both in dreamscapes and in naturalistic description. The sexual suggestiveness is very powerful, as is the evocation of NY place time in all its gritty glory.
-Robert Scotto, Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Baruch College, CUNY

What we have here is the pan / promenade of an Annapurnian poet among the sidewalks of New York. With eastern wisdom, Yuyutsu Sharma dissects the modern city’s multifaceted body, and portrays colliding visions where ancestral meets cutting-edge. As a poet of refined lyricism and a flâneur of his age, Sharma revives the wandering poet’s myth and builds powerful images in a high-voltage and emotional language: “In my chest / I can hear a blizzard / carrying a litany / of ravaged whales, a crude commotion / of water / and winds in spacious streets…”
-Mariela Dreyfus, Peruvian poet, author of Pez

Yuyutsu Sharma’s Blizzard in My Bones: New York Poems posits a pair of eyes up in their perch and looking down on the city of New York (and all of America) as they sweep across the pavement and finally settle on bit of muffin left on a table outside of a Starbuck’s. They are poems that look and venture deeply into the mannerisms of a young continent even as they insinuate themselves into a bustling scene. They suspect the “wandering lunatics,” “the basking brown seals,” and the “ceramic cells of Super gurus” stand as markers on this New Found Land, as the eyes behind the poems continue consuming everything on the move.
-Tim Kahl, poet, translator, Sacramento

In A Blizzard in My Bones, Yuyu Sharma reveals the divide that exists inside the professional traveler, who, though he must learn to be at home everywhere, finds he is no longer completely at home anywhere. Invited to ride alongside Sharma’s wanderer, we see from the inside out how he compares his worlds, one to another, trying to make sense of the new ones based on the sense of the old. When the gap remains, however, just wide enough to prevent easy passage back and forth, he is left to wrestle all his concurrent lives into one integrated, harmonious whole, perhaps at the cost of losing “the solemn silence of the sacred sounds
Susan Keiser, Key West scriptwriter and traveler

Announcing The Mystery over Buddha’s Roots: An Analysis of the Mystery of the Shakya Kingdom

budha-today

Mitsuaki Kojima is a distinguished Japanese policy essayist on global and domestic issues.

He has served as the Ambassador of Japan to Nepal and Ambassador to Luxembourg and held important posts in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs such as Deputy Director of Disarmament Division, Director of Research Division and South American Division respectively, and also Managing Director of Planning Department, Japan International Cooperation Agency.

He obtained a Master’s degree in Economics from Keio University, as well as a Master’s in political science from Yale University. Kojima was accorded The Grand-Croix de l’Ordre du Merite in Luxembourg in March, 2006. Currently, he works as President, the Japan Nepal Society and lives in Tokyo.