EL AL: Streets of Manhattan: Yuyutsu Sharma’s Column on New York City

LOGI THT
Streets of Manhattan
Musings on New York’s ability to embrace all
Added At: 2013-09-28 10:46 PM Last Updated At: 2013-09-28 10:46 PM

Fifth Avenue

YUYUTSU RD SHARMA
KATHMANDU:

Your name

like your yogurt kisses

I long to forget

in the boulevards of NYC’s

alphabet avenues

Your kisses

like your cherry mouth

sings Starbucks songs

of winds stirred by flames

of freedom.

(Your Name, A Blizzard in my Bones)

“There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless,” says Simone Beauvoir about the vital bustle the mega city. For over a year, I have been working on the manuscript of my New York poems, entitled, A Blizzard in My Bones. The very energy of the city is electrifying in a special way, making you go back to it, and walk its bistros, boulevards and shores, even when you are away, far, far away.

The first time I went there, I had fortune of living in Greenwich Village where legendary John Lennon “regretted profoundly” that he “was not born in”.

Back home as the Kathmandu Valley rivers swelled from incessant monsoons, I have been walking the suburbs, working long hours in small tea shops over my notes on this city of cities where, in words of Groucho Marx, “Practically everybody … has half a mind to write a book — and does.”

In the winter of 2012, I also had the leisure of walking the numbered streets of Manhattan with my manuscript in mind, hanging out with fellow poets, spending time in art places, libraries and spacious bookstores. Often, I went to share my works at local NYC poetry venues, and read almost everything I could lay my hands on —memoirs, poetry, stories, reports along with all time favourites like Catcher in the Rye, The Great Gatsby, Lunch Poems, even recent books on the city, including, Salman Rushdie’s Fury and Deborah Landau’s The Last Usable Hour.

One of the first few books I had read about the city remains Maxim Gorky’s The City of the Yellow Demon. The book had clouded my vision of the city for a long time. Gorky sees New York as a bleak underworld without a glint of happiness, a working class hell. However, landing in New York, I was amazed to find a very different world. What I saw was not a dreary dungeon, but as Salvador Dali pointed out “an Egypt turned inside out. For she erected pyramids of slavery to death, and you erect pyramids of democracy with the vertical organ-pipes of your skyscrapers all meeting at the point of infinity of liberty!”

Another crucial book I found by chance in a Greenwich Village cafe was Federico Garcia Lorca’s Poet in New York City. Again, I had difficulty in dealing with Lorca’s surreal accounts the city emptied of any spirituality, “a city that doesn’t sleep”. Lorca presents the metropolis as a brutal place where every day “they slaughter/four million ducks,/five million hogs,/two thousand pigeons to accommodate the tastes of the dying,/one million cows,/one million lambs,/and two million roosters/that smash the sky to pieces”.

Could I too write on this city in a similar vein? Just because it is customary for poets to be critical of the cities and civilisations? Shall I lash the city that has become a refuge for million nationalities from every corner of the world, including the American people from every State?

Over the years, my stay in New York City had given me different impressions. While working on my take on it, I could see how today the Cold War bias was uncalled for, almost irrational. I could not but celebrate this glorious city’s status as previously I had celebrated the Himalayas. The Himalayas are nature-made and New York man-made, humanity’s triumph. For that is what hopefully in the coming decades humanity would turn into, if it evolves from tribal, narrow visions.
Nyc cityscape
“Make your mark in New York,” wrote Mark Twain, “and you are a made man.” Last year I reached the city a week before the Hurricane Sandy hit the West Coast and a month before notorious New Town massacre. I had expected the worst, the whole island upside down, civilian life disrupted. Due to nasty road expansion work and chaos in my own Himalayan metropolis, I had sore memories seething in my mind. Due to the hurricane, my NYU assignments were postponed for a couple of weeks and I had to prolong my stopover in London.

After a fortnight as I reached the city, I found everything in order. Eager, I looked for the signs the calamity might have caused. Like a child, I ran in the spacious streets of Manhattan and took E Train to Brooklyn. All I got was some stray narratives of the Sandy-hit areas in few poetry readings. So quickly, the Sandy catastrophe had turned into a thing of the past. People talked how there was no electricity for a few days and one of my poet friends said she had to go all the way to affluent Uptown to get a hot cup of coffee.

On my way back on subway past midnight, I went laughing all the way. I had left the Valley where 18 hours of power-cuts has become a norm. Our children have grown up groping in the darkness of a republic-in-the-making that has not been able to find a focus. They have become used to the drone of maddening power generators and the clouds of dusts of hovering over the streets ripped apart and left bleeding like permanent wounds. Day to day civilian suffering along with rampant corruption has left a permanent scar on the face of Nepali polity.

Of course, you expect quick action from a First World nation, one could argue, and there’s nothing to be surprised if things had come back to normal. That’s not the only reason that makes you celebrate the city of the blazing skyline. New York is a place where humanity has evolved. No matter where you come from, you are welcomed there the morning you arrive. All you have to do is imbibe the free spirit of a New Yorker. “One belongs to New York instantly,” discerns Tom Wolfe, “one belongs to it as much in five minutes as in five years.”

To the rest of the world, it might seem different. If ever the humanity evolves into a place of ultimate coexistence, that’s what it would look like, a New York. What to talk of Europe and Americas, we know how in our own subcontinent, in cities like Kathmandu, Mumbai or New Delhi, in the inner circles the outsiders are looked upon with suspicion and distrust. Our cities have a long history of ostracising and humiliating outsiders. The literatures in vernacular languages of the subcontinent are full of such tribal assaults of our so-called “barbarous civilisations”. That’s why one wonders, wasn’t it along such lines of logic Walt Whitman had to shout, “Give me such shows — give me the streets of Manhattan!”

Your smile

like your bright eyes

stays calm as stars

over blue Atlantic waters.

Your eyes

like your dolphin heart

beats frantic

in the numbered streets

of Manhattan.

Your heart mind

reading horoscopes

of my life’s withered leaf

aflutter in the dark streets

of your city.

(Your Name, A Blizzard in my Bones)

(The writer can be reached at yuyutsurd@yahoo.com)
NEW yORK

Distinguished Poet David Austell to read at Jani Rose Gallery, Summit, NY

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A Reading from
TIN MAN
& Other Poems
By David B Austell
March 7th
Thurseday,
at Jani Rose Gallery
MONDO Summit – 426 Springfield Avenue, Summit, NJ
6-9 pm Thursday, March 7
Microsoft Word - THE TIN MAN POSTER FOR READING AT MONDO SUMMIT
Distinguished American Poet shall read from his new book due out in 2014!
He shall also sign copies of his previously published book, Garuda and Little Creek

DR. DAVID B. AUSTELL (United States) grew up in the southern part of the United States during the 1950s and 1960s, his love of poetry growing from deep roots: from his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and from his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child. He completed undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education. He has undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education (his dissertation, The Birds in the Rich Forest, concerned Chinese students in the United States during the Student Democracy Movement). In 1992, he was a Fulbright grantee in Korea and Japan. He is currently the Executive Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City where he is also an adjunct Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School His first book of poetry, Little Creek, was published in January 2011 by Nirala Press, and his second volume, Garuda (also published by Nirala), was released in March 2012. David’s poetry has also appeared in Infusion Magazine, and in The Rutherford Red Wheelbarrow.

Yuyutsu Sharma and David Austell: Upcoming NYC, NJ and Boston Readings

Yuyutsu Sharma is South Asian’s leading poet published by Nirala with growing International acclaim. After a brief stopover in London, he’s currently in New York City as a visiting poet at New York University He has just returned from a successful tour of Erie and Cleveland and has several upcoming readings up in New York, Boston, and West Coast. Here is a list of some immediate readings…

New York City

Monday, December 17, 2012: 8:00 pm: Yuyutsu Special Feature at Holiday Party of Saturn Series at Revival,   129 East 15 Street, Between Irving Place & 3rd Ave. New York, food, pot luck and Key Lime pie, Limited open Mike, http://www.revivalbarnyc.com/   www.supolo.com

David Austell is a distinguished American voice. Nirala has published two of his recent poetry collections. Austell works at New York University and    is currently working on his ambitious book  project, The Tin Man focused on Biblical character, Joseph. 

New Jersey

Saturday, December 22, 2012: 7:30 pm: From Chomolungla to Olympus Mons: Readings from Yuyutsu Sharma and David Austell at Mondo Summit,426 Springfield Avenue, Third Floor, New Jersey, www.mondosummit.com   David Austell shall read from Little Creek and recently published, Garuda and Other Poems of Astral Plains. Yuyutsu will use his Nepal Trilogy and Milarepa’s Bones, Helambu to evoke  the sacred summits in Summit,

Boston

Friday, January 4, 2012: 8:00 pm: Dire Literary Series: James Arthur,  Yuyutsu Sharma,  & David Austell  at The Out of the Blue Gallery, 106 Prospect Street,  Cambridge Massachusetts,  Starts at Four 15 minute open mike slots at 8 pm, followed by Features: Sign up at 7 pm http://www.timothygager.com/

 

Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished poet and translator. He has  published nine poetry collections including, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New Poems, (Nirala, New Delhi 2012),  Nepal Trilogy, Photographs and Poetry on Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang (www.Nepal-Trilogy.de, Epsilonmedia, Karlsruhe, 2010), a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, (Howling Dog Press, Colorado, 2009) and Annapurna Poems, 2008, Reprint, 2012). Yuyutsu also brought out a translation of Irish poet Cathal O’ Searcaigh poetry in Nepali in a bilingual collection entitled, Kathmandu: Poems, Selected and New, (2006) and a translation of Hebrew poet Ronny Someck’s poetry in Nepali in a bilingual edition, Baghdad, February 1991 & He has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English and launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry. Two books of his poetry, Poemes de l’ Himalayas (L’Harmattan, Paris) and Poemas de Los Himalayas (Cosmopoeticia, Cordoba, Spain) just appeared in French and Spanish respectively.
Widely traveled author, he has read his works at several prestigious places including Poetry Café, London, Seamus Heaney Center for Poetry, Belfast, New York University, New York, The Kring, Amsterdam, P.E.N. Paris, Knox College, Illinois, Whittier College, California, Baruch College, New York, WB Yeats’ Center, Sligo, Gustav Stressemann Institute, Bonn,  Rubin Museum, New York, Irish Writers’ Centre, Dublin, The Guardian Newsroom, London,  Trois Rivieres Poetry Festival, Quebec, Arnofini, Bristol, Borders, London, Slovenian Book Days, Ljubljana, Royal Society of Dramatic Arts, London, Gunter Grass House, Bremen, GTZ, Kathmandu, Nehru Center, London, March Hare, Newfoundland, Canada, Frankfurt Book Fair, Frankfurt, Indian International Center, New Delhi, and Villa Serbelloni, Italy.
He has held workshop in creative writing and translation at Queen’s University, Belfast, University of Ottawa and South Asian Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany, University of California, Davis, Sacramento State University, California and New York University, New York. His works have appeared in Poetry Review, Chanrdrabhaga, Sodobnost, Amsterdam Weekly, Indian Literature, Irish Pages, Delo, Modern Poetry in Translation, Exiled Ink, Iton77, Little Magazine, The Telegraph, Indian Express and Asiaweek. Born at Nakodar, Punjab and educated at Baring Union Christian College, Batala and later at Rajasthan University, Jaipur, Yuyutsu remained active in the literary circles of Rajasthan and acted in plays by Shakespeare, Bertolt Brecht, Harold Pinter, and Edward Albee. Later he taught at various campuses of Punjab University, and Tribhuwan University, Kathmandu.

The Library of Congress has nominated his recent book of Nepali translations entitled Roaring Recitals; Five Nepali Poets as Best Book of the Year 2001 from Asia under the Program, A World of Books International Perspectives. Yuyutsu’s own work has been translated into German, French, Italian, Slovenian, Hebrew, Spanish and Dutch. He just published his nonfiction, Annapurnas & Stains of Blood: Life, Travel and Writing a Page of Snow, (Nirala, 2010). He edits Pratik, A Magazine of Contemporary Writing and contributes literary columns to Nepal’s leading daily, The Himalayan Times. He has just returned from the Poetry Parnassus Festival organized to celebrate London Olympics 2012 where he represented Nepal and India and will be visiting NYU later in the year as Special Guest during International Education Week. Half the year, he travels and reads all over the world to read from his works and conducts creative writing workshop at various universities in North America and Europe but goes trekking in the Himalayas when back home.

More: www.yuyutsu.de,

 

DR.  DAVID B. AUSTELL (United States)  is an emerging voice in the arena of contemporary American poetry. Austell grew up in the southern part of the United States during the 1950s and 1960s, his love of poetry growing from deep roots: from his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and from his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child. He completed undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education.  He has undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education (his dissertation, The Birds in the Rich Forest, concerned Chinese students in the United States during the Student Democracy Movement). In 1992, he was a Fulbright grantee in Korea and Japan. He is currently the Executive Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City where he is also an adjunct Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School  His first book of poetry, Little Creek, was published in January 2011 by Nirala Press, and his second volume, Garuda (also published by Nirala), was released in March 2012.  David’s poetry has also appeared in Infusion Magazine, and in The Rutherford Red Wheelbarrow.

More: http://www.davidaustell.blogspot.com/

New Paperback edition of Annapurna Poems out!

 

This is a major anthology from one of South Asia’s most prominent poet’s who has made Annapurna region his home for last two decades.

Yuyutsu’s devotion for the mountains and the people living there is unparalleled. Though his work was interrupted with the rise of insurgency and the consequent political turmoil in the Himalayan nation, the poet continued to long for the hidden valleys and mule paths where, as the scriptures say, the soul of the Gods lives.

Even in his dreams he conjures the treks to the remote Himalayan regions, searching for life on the bleeding mule paths of human struggle, listening to the chorus of cicadas and dramas of hunger and strife in the hushed grounds of Little Paradise Lodge, chartering history of human attempts to invade the realm of eternal snow with moving cameras, frozen spaghetti and plastic bags.Like exquisite fields of Himalayan flowers, these are poems of high artistic integrity about harsh truths of mystery, history and humanity.

Sensual, sharp and stunning, these concrete images will leave the readers breathless. A huge achievement, bringing alive the unsung agony of the people of the high Himalaya

https://www.amazon.com/dp/8182500478

http://www.amazon.in/dp/8182500478

Yuyutsu Sharma's Current North American Tour

 

Yuyutsu Sharma is South Asian’s leading poet published by Nirala with growing International acclaim. After a brief stopover in London, he’s currently in New York City as a visiting poet at New York University He has several upcoming readings in New York, Boston, Erie and Ohio. Here is a list of  some of the upcoming events…

 

Erie, Pennsylvania

Sunday, December 2, 2012: 3:00 pm: Yuyutsu Special Guest at Poets’ Hall -the International Fellowship of Poets and Spoken Word Artists 1136 E. Lake Rd, Erie, Pennsylvania 16507,  Event Hosted By Cee Williams and Chuck Joy

Tuesday, December 4, 2012 at 7 pm:Yuyutsu Sharma’s Gannon University Reading at The Knight Club 4th and Sassafras Streets, Erie,16541  Event Sponsored by Sigma Tan Delta and The English Department, Gannon University, Open to All

New York Upstate

Sunday, December 9, 2012, 3;30 pm ; Yuyutsu Sharma at read at William Seaton’ s  Dada:An Introduction’s book Launch at the Seligmann Center for the Arts, 23 White Oak Drive, Sugar Loaf, New York  Books by both authors will be available Admission is free.

Cleveland, Ohio

Saturday, December 1, 2012 at 8 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma Reading as Special Guest at WritingKnights Press Event, Literary Cafe 1031 Literary Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44113

Wednesday,  December 5, 2012 at 7 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma Reading at Mac’s Backs,
1820 Coventry Road  Cleveland Heights, OH 44118 (216) 321-2665 Open to All www.macsbacks.com/contact

Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished poet and translator.
He has  published nine poetry collections including, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New Poems, (Nirala, New Delhi 2012),  Nepal Trilogy, Photographs and Poetry on Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang (www.Nepal-Trilogy.de, Epsilonmedia, Karlsruhe, 2010), a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, (Howling Dog Press, Colorado, 2009) and Annapurna Poems, 2008, Reprint, 2012).

Yuyutsu also brought out a translation of Irish poet Cathal O’ Searcaigh poetry in Nepali in a bilingual collection entitled, Kathmandu: Poems, Selected and New, (2006) and a translation of Hebrew poet Ronny Someck’s poetry in Nepali in a bilingual edition, Baghdad, February 1991 & He has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English and launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry.
Two books of his poetry, Poemes de l’ Himalayas (L’Harmattan, Paris) and Poemas de Los Himalayas (Cosmopoeticia, Cordoba, Spain) just appeared in French and Spanish respectively.

Widely traveled author, he has read his works at several prestigious places including Poetry Café, London, Seamus Heaney Center for Poetry, Belfast, New York University, New York, The Kring, Amsterdam, P.E.N. Paris, Knox College, Illinois, Whittier College, California, Baruch College, New York, WB Yeats’ Center, Sligo, Gustav Stressemann Institute, Bonn,  Rubin Museum, New York, Irish Writers’ Centre, Dublin, The Guardian Newsroom, London,  Trois Rivieres Poetry Festival, Quebec, Arnofini, Bristol, Borders, London, Slovenian Book Days, Ljubljana, Royal Society of Dramatic Arts, London, Gunter Grass House, Bremen, GTZ, Kathmandu, Nehru Center, London, March Hare, Newfoundland, Canada, Frankfurt Book Fair, Frankfurt, Indian International Center, New Delhi, and Villa Serbelloni, Italy.
He has held workshop in creative writing and translation at Queen’s University, Belfast, University of Ottawa and South Asian Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany, University of California, Davis, Sacramento State University, California and New York University, New York.
His works have appeared in Poetry Review, Chanrdrabhaga, Sodobnost, Amsterdam Weekly, Indian Literature, Irish Pages, Delo, Modern Poetry in Translation, Exiled Ink, Iton77, Little Magazine, The Telegraph, Indian Express and Asiaweek.
Born at Nakodar, Punjab and educated at Baring Union Christian College, Batala and later at Rajasthan University, Jaipur, Yuyutsu remained active in the literary circles of Rajasthan and acted in plays by Shakespeare, Bertolt Brecht, Harold Pinter, and Edward Albee. Later he taught at various campuses of Punjab University, and Tribhuwan University, Kathmandu.
The Library of Congress has nominated his recent book of Nepali translations entitled Roaring Recitals; Five Nepali Poets as Best Book of the Year 2001 from Asia under the Program, A World of Books International Perspectives.
Yuyutsu’s own work has been translated into German, French, Italian, Slovenian, Hebrew, Spanish and Dutch. He just published his nonfiction, Annapurnas & Stains of Blood: Life, Travel and Writing a Page of Snow, (Nirala, 2010). He edits Pratik, A Magazine of Contemporary Writing and contributes literary columns to Nepal’s leading daily, The Himalayan Times.

He has just returned from the Poetry Parnassus Festival organized to celebrate London Olympics 2012 where he represented Nepal and India and will be visiting NYU later in the year as Special Guest during International Education Week.

Half the year, he travels and reads all over the world to read from his works and conducts creative writing workshop at various universities in North America and Europe but goes trekking in the Himalayas when back home.
More: www.yuyutsu.de, www.niralapublications.com

 

Yuyutsu Sharma to speak at William Seaton' s Book Launch at Seligmann Center

 

 Yuyutsu Sharma to speak at William Seaton’ s Book Launch at Seligmann Center

    

William Seaton will read his translations of Dada poetry and his own original Dada-influenced works in a program that will also feature his editor, leading Nepali/Indian poet Yuyutsu Ram Dass Sharma.  The event will take place at 3:30 on Sunday, December 9 at the Seligmann Center for the Arts, 23 White Oak Drive, Sugar Loaf, New York.  Books by both authors will be available, including Seaton’s just-published Dada Poetry: An Introduction.  Admission is free.

Seaton’s book includes translations of four German Dada poets along with an introduction and essays, including a meditation on the future of the avant-garde.  Seaton’s translations of Dada poets have appeared earlier in Chelsea, Maintenant, Mad Blood, Read and Destroy, and the Adirondack Review.   Seaton’s own poetry has been published in the volumes Spoor of Desire: Selected Poems, Tourist Snapshots, and Cold Water.   His poetry, reviews, translations, and essays have recently appeared in Poetry Flash, Chiron Review, Adirondack Review, Gander Press Review, Burp, Heaven Bone, and Maintenant.

An advocate of the public performance of poetry, Seaton has, throughout his life, participated in numerous events joining words with theater and visual art including work on 60s “happenings,” participation with the Cloud House guerilla poets in San Francisco during the 70s, and recent Surreal Cabarets of performance art at the Center in Sugar Loaf.  He has read as well in San Francisco, New York, London, Prague, and Kathmandu.

He directs the Poetry on the Loose Reading/Performance Series, is co-founder and president of the Northeast Poetry Center (www.collegeofpoetry.com), and posts five essays, literary and familiar, every month at williamseaton.blogspot.com.

Sharma’s work as an editor for Nirala is perhaps the least of his roles.  He is one of the most distinguished poets of Nepal.  Of his many poetry collections, the more recent include Milarepa’s Bones, Hunger of Our Huddled Huts, The Lake Fewa & a HorseSpace Cake Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, and Around Annapurna.  Sharma has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English.  Though much of his work is securely grounded in the Himalayan landscape, he is a true cosmopolitan who regularly reads in Europe and the USA as well as throughout Asia.  His poetry has been translated into German, French, Italian, Hebrew, Spanish and Dutch.

He is the recipient of many prestigious grants, including awards from the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Academy of Letters (New Delhi), Ireland Literary Exchange, and the Trubar Foundation (Slovenia).  Sharma’s book of translations, Roaring Recitals: Five Nepali Poets, was nominated by the Library of Congress as best book of the year from Asia in 2001.

More information and samples of poetry are available on Sharma’s websites  www.yuyutsu.de and yuyutsurdsharma.blogspot.com.

     For several years the Seligmann Center for the Arts has been sponsoring events including shows of contemporary and historic art in honor of Surrealist artist Kurt Seligmann and his wife Arlette whose estate houses the Center as well as the Orange County Citizen’s Foundation and the Orange County Arts Council.

     Contact William Seaton  at seaton@frontiernet.net for further information.

 

William Seaton is a well-known American scholar and poet.  Seaton is author of Spoor of Desire (FootHills Publishing, 2008), Tourist Snapshots (CCMarimbo, 2008), andCold Water (Monkey’s Press, 1999).  His poetry, reviews, translations, and essays have recently appeared in Poetry FlashChiron ReviewGander Press ReviewWordsmith,Edison ReviewHome Planet NewsHeaven Bone, and Chronogram.

Also known for his translations of ancient Greek lyrics and medieval troubadours, Seaton was educated in the University of Illinois’ English Department and the University ofIowa’s Comparative Literature Program including work in translation under Anselm Hollo and Stavros Deligiorgis in the Translation Workshop.  He has received such academic honors as the Helen Fairall Scholarship Award and the Ada Louise Ballard Fellowship in the Humanities.

His scholarly articles concern topics ranging from a medieval mystic to African American oral rhymed narratives, and his teaching experience is equally broad, including positions at Long Island and Adelphi Universities, a New York state prison, and high school in the Niger Delta of West Africa.

For decades Seaton has translated the poets of the early twentieth century Dada movement as well as engaging in Dada-inspired performance events beginning with “happenings” in the 60s, through the guerilla poetry of Cloud House in the 70s, and recent Surreal Cabarets at the Seligmann Center for the Arts.  Some of these translations of twentieth century German Dada poets have been published in periodical form in ChelseaAdirondack ReviewRead and DestroyMaintenant, and Mad Blood.

He directs the Poetry on the Loose Reading/Performance Series in New York’s Hudson Valley, heads the Northeast Poetry Center and its College of Poetry(www.collegeofpoetry.com), and posts five essays, literary and familiar, every month at williamseaton.blogspot.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Release: Dada Poetry: An Introduction by William Seaton

Dada Poetry: An Introduction is a stimulating new book on the avant-garde literary movement that had a lasting impact on world culture, art, and literature.
“Rather like the blows and koans of Rinzai Zen and the cunning dreams we all conjure nightly,” says Seaton in the introduction to the book, “the purest manifestations of Dada seek to shake the observer into enlightenment through oblique attacks,saucing the onslaught with wit, political passion, and effervescent bohemianism.”
Having exposed the basics of the Dada movement in German literature, Seaton translates four Dada poets from the German, invoking the “ghost voices” of the old poets like Emmy Hennings, Richard Huelsenbeck, Han Arp, and Hugo Ball. A special chapter is devoted to the art of literary translation, the sweet treason. The author also tests whether the spells of these master remain efficacious for readers in the twenty-first century. Seaton ends the volume with a lament for the loss of the avant-garde.
A mine of riches, the book is a must for students of literature, artists, culture critics, and historians.

From the foreword by Timothy Shipe:
“Translators have paid scant attention to the poetic output of the German-speaking participants in the Dada movement . . . here at last is William Seaton’s anthology of four German Dada poets . . . for the first time, the English-speaking reader will find a generous sampling of German Dada poetry in a single volume.”

ISBN 81-8250-035-4 Hard 2013 pp 128 Rs.395

YUYUTSU SHARMA SPECIAL GUEST AT NYU EDUCATION WEEK!

  • NYU Open House 528 LaGuardia Place New York, NY
  • Dartmoor and Annapurna Poetry Event
    Thursday, November 15, 2012
    NYU Open House
    528 LaGuardia Place
    New York, NYThe NYU Office for International Students and Scholars (soon to be the Office of Global Services) presents theGlobal Poets Event, Dartmoor and Annapurna, in celebration of International Education Week 2012. Featuring readings by two world renowned poets, Yuyutsu Ram Dass Sharma (Nepal) and Christopher Southgate (England), this event also includes live music, a poets’ talk-back, and reception.

    When: Thursday, November 15 at 7pm
    Where: NYU Open House at 528 LaGuardia Place
    RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/9wew5qn
    Free of charge, Open to the public
    Questions? Email oiss.events@nyu.edu