Meet Distinguished American poet David Austell in Kathmandu

Meet the Author
David
Meet the Distinguished American Poet
David Austell
Austell  will read from his books,  Little Creek. & Other Poems and Garuda & Other Poems of Astral Plains and his forthcoming ambitious book, The Tin Man based on the enigmatic biblical character of St. Joseph of Armathea.

Nirdoshharuko Nyay, a volume of Austell’s poetry translated into Nepali by Yuyutsu Sharma will be launched.

Some noted Nepalese Poets will also read.

Date: 7 November, 2014, Friday
Time : 3 pm
Venue: Nepal Bar Association Hall,
Ram Shah Path,
Next to Supreme Court, Kathmandu

Organized by
White Lotus Book Shop,
Kupondole, Lalitpur, Kathmandu
RSVP: 5520248, 9803171925

About David Austell
Raised in Concord, North Carolina (United States), and educated at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, David Austell studied English Literature at the bachelors and masters levels at UNC where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education, focusing on International Education (his dissertation, The Birds in the Rich Forest, having focused on Chinese students in the United States).
The love of poetry grows from deep roots, and in David’s case from his parents: his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child.
David’s first book of poetry, Little Creek, was published in January 2011 by Nirala Press. His second volume, Garuda (also published by Nirala), was released in March 2012. In 2013, Nirala reissued Little Creek in a revised paperback volume. His fourth book, The Tin Man, is expected from Nirala Press in January 2015.
Dr. David B. Austell is the Associate Provost and Director of the International Students and Scholars Office at Columbia University in New York City. David was previously the Assistant Vice President and Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City for seven years, where he was also an Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School (adjunct).
David is also a musician, and he lives in Brooklyn, with his college sweetheart, Amanda. The Austell’s have two daughters.

Nirala Interviews : In Conversation with Larry Peters

Larry Peters photo

Dr. Larry Peters is a world-renowned scholar and initiated shaman in the Tamang tradition. He was recipient of the Regent’s Fellowship at the University of California Los Angeles, and an NIMH post-doctoral fellow at UCLA’s Neuropsychiatric Institute. Dr. Peters holds advanced degrees in both Anthropology and Psychology. He has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Nepal, China, Mongolia, and Siberia and is a Nepal Research Associate of the Foundation for Shamanic Studies. Dr. Peters has published extensively on shamanism, conducts workshops on Tamang and Tibetan Shamanism in the United States, Europe, and Asia, and leads experiential Initiation Journeys to Nepal. In 1999, his highly acclaimed book, Tamang Shamans: An Ethnopsychiatric Study of Ecstasy and Healing in Nepal appeared in the Nirala Series. His second book, Trance, Initiation and Psychotherapy in Nepalese Shamanism: Essays on Tamang and Tibetan Shamanism was published in 2004 in the same series. His pioneering research, Yeti: Spirit of Himalayan Forest Shaman came a year after. Dr. Peters is a retired professor of Anthropology and Psychology at the California Graduate Institute in Los Angeles, California. Dr. Peters is a licensed psychotherapist in the State of California, the author of five books and many dozen articles, including Ode to Dreams, a poetry compilation.

In response to the questions about his work in the Himalayas where he met his first shaman Guru, Birendra and later his current Guru Ama Bombo, Dr. Peters sent us an intriguing account of his ethnographic work with Nepalese shamans.


Over the decades Peters has brought hundreds of scholars and those seeking shamanic initiation to work with Nepalese shamans like Aama Bombo of Boudha and led an eventful life as ‘Sahib Jhankari’ ( Gentleman Shaman) as he’s known in the Himalayas today.

Here are excerpts of his response to us.

lpdrum

Most significant experiences in my life occurred in altered states of consciousness. When I was 24 years old, I developed a meditation practice focused on some very vivid dream experiences. Over the years (I am now 71), I studied various methods of interpreting their meanings. I studied psychology and underwent both Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis. Currently I am a licensed psychotherapist, hold a PhD in anthropology, and conducted post-doctoral work in psychiatry. I learned most of my dreams were mirrors of my own psyche telling me symbolically who I was and was becoming. A few, however, were windows giving me an anomalous foreknowledge into important life events. Psychological analysis provided few answers because it reduced dream experiences to one or another system. Systems that were often at odds with one another, and that did not speak to the heart. As I said, I had a few prophetic insights from dreams that could not be rationally explained. The overwhelming majority of my dreams and visions, however, revealed little knowledge of the future. What was missing in all my early research was relationship to the various images. That is, the dream images were not just lifeless symbols of psychological processes, be they “complexes” or “archetypes,” but beings with their own ontologies. In other words, spirits! This is shamanism. Nothing else qualifies. Such is the essence of Nepalese shamanism and my understanding of shamanism world-wide. I discovered this in Nepal during my apprenticeship with Bhirendra in 1975-76 and later with Aama Bombo beginning in 1993 after Bhirendra had passed.

The early 1970’s were a very unorthodox period to be studying anthropology at UCLA. Carlos Castaneda was a student and part-time lecturer. Carlos had apprenticed himself to Don Juan, a Yaqui Indian shaman living in Mexico. Carlos experienced unusual consciousness states, learned much about healing, and about the nature of another reality well beyond the common worldview held in the West. Carlos’ books became very popular and initiated a type of anthropological research called “experiential anthropology.” This was my research design and I received a grant in order to conduct it. I wanted to experience shamanism; that is to say, the “shamanic state of consciousness;” and then return to academia and attempt to explain that experience in psychological and anthropological terms. In this way, the terrain to be explored anthropologically was of an “inner landscape” of images as I experienced them under the initiatory tutelage of Bhirendra.

The chairman of my dissertation committee was Professor Jacques Maquet, who had done a similar study of Vipasana in Burma and Sri Lanka. Many of my fellow students were deployed to other corners of the world. We thought of ourselves as “gnostic intermediaries” attempting to bridge the gap between modern psychology and different spiritualities, their methods of induction, and of altered states of consciousness within the religious and cultural context.

As mentioned above, I had a meditative practice for years and had studied psychology and had personal analysis. I also had taken workshops and made pilgrimages to ashrams and monasteries, and learned from Buddhist lama and Hindu sages. I therefore felt that I had prepared myself academically, psychologically, and spiritually to move to Nepal for a year to study the shamanic state of consciousness. What I discovered was that I had very limited talent to be a healer. My jochana (divinations) were not windows into another reality but more like mirrors into my own heart and psyche. I had other problems too. My language skills in Nepali are weak. I could drum for hours but I never learned to shake. Consequently, I never became possessed. However, I had visions. Bhirendra called many of them “crazy visions.” But I was persistent, and soon I learned to develop relations and interact with the dreamscape images, that is to say the spirits. Bhirendra thought some images I described to him shared identity with some spirits of Nepal, and these spirits became my guides and inner teachers. Through a translator, I described my visions to Bhirendra and, in this manner, he taught me about Tamang shamanism. I learned about the shamans’ deities and who their “chief gurus” were, and Bhirendra’s, and later Aama’s, and I would then visit the deities’ shrines, and I would receive initiations, power transmissions, and blessings for continuing my work. Many full moon days, I pilgrimaged to the sacred shrines and danced in costume with Bhirendra, also with Aama, and other shamans and students. I have gone on tirta nach, a pilgrimage dance, to Kumbeswaar, Kalinchok, Richeswaar, etc. etc. I also experienced one three-day and two five-day gufa (cave) ceremonies with Aama that are described in my book, Trance, Initiation and Psychotherapy in Nepalese Shamanism. In this way, Bhirendra and Aama’s brand of Tamang shamanism became my spiritual discipline and, in time, I came to develop a relationship in dreams and visions to a small yeti who became my spirit guide, chief spirit guru, and teacher, about death and destruction, love and mercy, generosity and kindness.

I met Bhirendra in Boudhanath, which was much less populated in 1975 than it is today. I did a census and there were only about 1200 people residing in Boudha and the neighboring village of Tin Chuli. Often, at night, I would hear the drums of ritual and I would follow them. More often than not, I met shamans doing healing puja at their clients’ homes. There were at least 14 folks who identified themselves as being a shaman. Bhirendra was one of them. I immediately noticed that he delivered a fuller rendition of the healing puja than the others had performed, and he seemed to be more proficient at telling the mythologies and sacred shamanic stories. Bhirendra was a ban jhankri, an initiate of a smaller-than-human yeti-like creature.

Indeed, early on, some identified me as a sahib jhankri (gentleman shaman). This was a complimentary but not an accurate epithet. I was merely an experiential researcher into shamanic techniques of altered consciousness, not a healer like Aama and Bhirendra, and the other shamans and shaman disciples in Boudhanath. In other words, becoming a sahib jkankri was not my intention. I am an anthropologist as well as a psychotherapist, but my orientation has always been experiential research focused on altered states of consciousness: dreams, trance, visions, channeling, contemplation, etc. Shamanism is a gateway, as are other spiritual disciplines, albeit shamanism is the earliest spiritual practice of humankind. Shamanic trance also has elements in common with various active imagination and “daydream” techniques of psychotherapy, but only in shamanism is relationship to spirit developed.

The skilled and dedicated Nepalese shaman also believes in modern medicine, and can recognize the difference between those illnesses that are medical and those caused by lagu or bad spirits. Both Aama and Bhirendra referred their acutely ill patients to the appropriate doctors. Indeed, both availed themselves personally of Western medicine when ill. I know that Aama has a very good relationship with a few of the doctors at the Teaching Hospital in Kathmandu.

Thus there isn’t any antipathy towards modern medicine on the part of the shamans. In fact, in my research in the 1970’s, I gave due attention to Nepalese shamans as knowledgeable about the ills of their community, noting they could be utilized, after some training, to be “barefoot doctors” when medical facilities are not available in remote locations.

Shamanism is at least a 40,000-year old survival strategy that still exists. In the west, it is not yet integrated into the medical model as are some other transpersonal practices that fulfill spiritual needs, like meditation. The ecstatic states of shamanism are at least as valuable. There are currently numerous shamanic schools, teachers, and healers from various cultural backgrounds working in the West. Consequently, we in the West now face a similar problem to what has already occurred in Nepal. How does one tell the charlatans who say they are shamans in order to line their own pockets from those with real concern for their clients’ welfare? When conducting research in Nepal. I met a few claiming to be shamans that I thought were fake. But how does one prove such a thing? Actually to accuse one of being a fraud, and exploiting others, is tantamount to accusing someone of being a bokshi (a sorcerer), something neither Bhirendra nor Aama ever did. Manipulation and exploitation are not the work of a true shaman. Indeed, charlatanism is a problem, but not only in shamanism. In my experience, it is a fact of life. Jiwan yastai chha.

A shaman is not a priest for any religion. A shaman is like a doctor, and people who are ill, and therefore vulnerable to manipulation, are the clientele of both. However, there are no official degrees or licenses, or legal and ethical review boards in shamanism. To be considered a shaman is only a matter of what a person claims to be true and his or her reputation for results.

It is possible to make a conscious decision to become a medical doctor or a psychologist, work hard and become successful. However, traditionally this is not how one becomes a shaman. To be a shaman, one must have a “calling.” The calling is an involuntary experience in which one is chosen by the spirits. Eliade, the University of Chicago, Historian of Religion, called shamanism an “involuntary vocation.” Spirit comes to the person on its own. It is not desired, but comes nonetheless. In some cultures, the future shaman becomes ill, almost dies, and has visions. Others believe him to be crazy. He has vivid hallucinations, sometimes nightmares. He may speak in an unknown language, or even run away, or be kidnapped by the spirits and then taken to the edge of civilization, perhaps into a jungle or forest, or to a mountain, or cave, or some other uninhabited area. Sometimes the candidate is forced to fast and goes without food or even drink for days on end. And, when he returns, if he has been able to escape death and return to his community (not all do!), the unwitting candidate may speak of having been taught by the spirits to do something new, to become someone new, to have nearly died or to have had a “near-death experience,” and yet to be reborn to a new way of being in the world with a new purpose in life. This is not the type of job one can refuse. If he tries, the candidate might become crazy, lost in madness, or perhaps fall ill and die. “No” is not an option when the shaman is “called.”

You may recognize the outline of the ban jhankri and I believe of the yeti as well, especially the small yeti who is called ban jhankri in the Nepalese mythological literature. In other words, the identity of the two is not my idea but is found in the literature of Nepal, researched by Nepalese scholars, all of whom are cited in my book. I must admit to having a special relationship to the ban jhankri.

For sure, some of the interest in shamanism in the West was a part of the New Age interest in many types of spiritual practices – some traditional and others innovative. However, shamanism is part of traditional practices on every continent. It is universal and has many elements in common with contemporary psychotherapy: faith, suggestion, corrective emotional experience, and group support, to mention a few. However, what is distinct in shamanism is the element of spirit relationship. That is, humans possess a psychological constitution that makes it possible to perceive a non-ordinary reality filled with spirit beings with their own ontology. Meeting with them and integrating them into one’s life is healing for psyche and soma. For me, the shamanic techniques of ecstasy permitted a dream-like journey into another reality to meet spirits that have guided my life for the better. That is, when I am wise enough to obey.

Thus I see shamanism as an adjunct to modern psychotherapy, but also think that it is a spiritual discipline. That is to say, shamanism utilizes archaic trance techniques and methods that can open new worlds. Fortunately, it is possible to learn these techniques as techniques and not as part of a religious dogma in the West. My Western teacher for the past 25 years is the anthropologist Michael Harner, Founder of the Foundation of Shamanic Studies, who has made these once forgotten methods accessible which has thus opened up another reality full of healing, compassion and wisdom that is sorely needed in the modern world.

Yuyutsu Sharma’s April Readings in New York City

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Sunday, April 6, 2014, 1pm – 4pm: Yuyutsu Sharma Reading at Oceanside Library, Davison Ave. Oceanside, NY 11572 766-2360; Hosted by Peter V. Dugan,
pdugan@optonline.net

Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma reading at The Poets Settlement at Breuckelen Colony, Hosted by Ricardo Thomas Manuel Hernandez 274 4th Avenue and Garfield Place, Park Slope, Brooklyn, 11220, Two Blocks away from Union Street R Train Station

Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 6:30: Yuyutsu Sharma featuring in Tom Kane’s Boulevard Bards Series, Hosted by Anthony Vigorito, Boulevard Books & Café, 7518 13th Avenue (between Bay Ridge Parkway & 76th St) Brooklyn, NY 11228

Thursday, April 10, 5:45pm Yuyutsu Sharma reading with Kevin Prufer, New York University at AIA New York Chapter House, located at 536 LaGuardia Place. Hosted by David Austell, NYU Office of Global Services, Open to the public. 212 998 4726 http://aiany.aiany.org/index.php?section=aia-new-york

Sunday April 13 4:00 pm; Yuyutsu Sharma with David Austell and Robert Scotto in Phoenix Reading Series @ The Upright Brewm 9944 : 547 Hudson Street NY, NY 10014 212-810- Hosted by Michael Graves, Open to public, An eight dollar ($8) cover buys a drink or pays part of a more expensive. Directions : www.uprightbrewhouse.com

Monday April 14, 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm; Yuyutsu Sharma feature at PPA Starbucks Reading, Hosted by James Romano, at 254-41 Horace Harding Expressway, Little Neck, New York 11362, Phone:516 434 9749

Friday, April 18, 2014 6:15 to 8:00 pm: Himalayan Poet in NYC,Rubin Museum Reading: Internationally renowned Himalayan poet Yuyutsu Sharma reads from new book and launches his new book, Nine New York Poems: A Prelude to A Blizzard in my Bones.( Nirala, 2014) Poet David Austell to Introduce Yuyu and his New Book; Rubin Museum, 150 W 17th St, New York, www.rmanyc.org. Phone: (212) 620-5000. Free and open to public.

Monday April 21 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm; Yuyutsu Sharma features as Special Guest at PPA Reading at Bean Café, Hosted by Lorraine LoFrese Colin at 2718, Grand Avenue, Bellmore, NY 516.804. 4624

Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 7:30 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma reading with David Austell, William Seaton and Patricia Spears Jones at Brownstone Poets, Dada Café, 57, Seventh Avenue, ( Corner of Lincoln Place), Park Slope, Brooklyn, Hosted by Patricia Carragon, , 11217, 718-622-2800 pcarragon@gmail.com

Thursday, April 24, 2014, 6:30pm to 8:30 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma to read at Barnes and Noble in Ken Siegelman’s Brooklyn Poetry Outreach Series, Hosted by Anthony Vigorito, Barnes & Noble, Park Slope 267 7th Ave (at 6th Street), Brooklyn, NY 11215

Friday, April 25, 2014, 7:30 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma in the Poets in the Port Series, Caffe Portofino in North Poet on Friday, Hosted by Mary Jane Tenerelli

prelude

Yuyutsu Sharma to read with David Austell at the Rubin Museum

Friday, Feb 7, 2014, 6:00-8:30 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma and David Austell, guests of the Rubin Museum of Art’s Himalayan Heritage Meetup Group, Theme: Love Poetry of the 6th Dalai Lama, Hosted by Tashi Chodron, Rubin Museum, 150 W 17th St, New York, www.rmanyc.org. Phone: (212) 620-5000. Free and open to public.
Meet in the Museum’s café at 6:00 pm.

220px-6DalaiLama

We are excited to invite you to the next session of the Himalayan Heritage Meet up group on Friday, February 7, from 6-8:30PM. This month, in honor of Valentine’s Day, we are inspired by the love poetry of the famous 6th Dalai Lama. Tsangyang Gyatso! We will meet in the Museum’s Serai Café at 6PM, then head to the galleries where we will explore some images and listen to poetry written by this unusual figure with our host, Tashi Chodron.

This month, we have the great opportunity to welcome two distinguished guest poets, Yuyutsu Sharma and David Austell from NYU. After our gallery experience, we will move to our Education Center where Yuyutsu Sharma will read from his book, Milarepa’s Bones, Helambu: 33 New Poems and David Austell will read from his new book. Garuda and Other Poems of Astral Plains accompanied by music and images. Afterwards we will all learn the melody to one of the 6th Dalai Lama’s renowned poems and socialize with some Valentine’s Day themed refreshments.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Date: Friday, February 7
Time: Meet in museum Café at 6:00. We move to the education Center at 6:45.

YUYU-DAVID

David B. Austell
David B. Austell is Assistant Vice President and Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City, where he is also an Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School (adjunct). David has undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education. In 1992, David was a Fulbright grantee in Japan and Korea. The love of poetry grows from deep roots, and in David’s case from his parents: his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child.

Yuyutsu RD Sharma
Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished poet and translator. He has published nine poetry collections including, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New Poems, (Nirala, New Delhi 2012), Nepal Trilogy, Photographs and Poetry on Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang (www.Nepal-Trilogy.de, Epsilonmedia, Karlsruhe, 2010), a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, (2009, Indian reprint 2013) and Annapurna Poems, 2008, Reprint, 2012).
Yuyutsu also brought out a translation of Irish poet Cathal O’ Searcaigh poetry in Nepali in a bilingual collection entitled, Kathmandu: Poems, Selected and New (2006) and a translation of Hebrew poet Ronny Someck’s poetry in Nepali in a bilingual edition, Baghdad, February 1991 & Other Poems. He has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English and launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry.

More about the poets can be had at www.niralapublications.com

Yuyutsu Sharma’s Upcoming Readings: New York, Connecticut, Ohio and Pennsylvania

New York

New York

Yuyutsu Sharma is South Asia’s leading poet published by Nirala with growing International acclaim. He is currently in New York City as a visiting poet at New York University and had several g readings in New York, Colorado, New Mexico and West Coast. Here is a list of some the immediate readings.
(Only Public readings are listed )


New York City

Friday, Feb 7, 2014, 6:00-8:30 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma and David Austell, guests of the Rubin Museum of Art’s Himalayan Heritage Meetup Group, Theme: Love Poetry of the 6th Dalai Lama, Hosted by Tashi Chodron, Rubin Museum, 150 W 17th St, New York, www.rmanyc.org. Phone: (212) 620-5000. Free and open to public.
Meet in the Museum’s café at 6:00 pm.

Tuesday, Feb 4, 2014, 6:30 pm, Acclaimed Poet Yuyutsu Sharma to read at
Port Jefferson Free Library
, 100 East Main St. / Port Jefferson, NY. Hosted by Katya Johanna: Open to public, Free.( Directions – Take Route 112 north. 112 turns into 25A/Main Street. Turn right at East Main Street (fancy street sign). Go up East Main Street, hooking left to Thompson Street (library on the right side). Turn right on Thompson Street) www.portjefflibrary.org Phone: 631.473.0022.

Monday, Feb 3, 2014, 9,00 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma at The Poet in New York Series with Stephen Motika and Musician Michael Beharie , Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery, New York, New York, Hosted by Elizabeth Peters, Co-curated by Nikhil Melnechuk, Open to public, $10.00, also Open Mike http://www.boweryartsandscience.org/ http://www.thepoetinnewyork.com/

Sunday, Feb 2, 2014, 4,00 pm-6:00 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma Phoenix Reading Series @ The Upright Brew with Michael Dorr, Bruce Weber, Joanne Pagano Weber: , 547 Hudson Street NY, NY 10014 212-810-9944 Hosted by Michael Graves : Open to public, An eight dollar ($8) cover buys a drink or pays part of a more expensive, Directions : www.uprightbrewhouse.com

Wednesday, Jan 29, 2014, 7,00 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma The Green Pavilion Poetry Event with David Austell and Valerie Conti.: 4307-18th Ave. Brooklyn (F train to 18th Ave. station. 4307-18th Ave. Bk * * *(F train to 18th Ave. station) Hosted by Evie Ivy : Open to public, $6.00 min. toward restaurant, $3.00 suggested donation.

Connecticut

Wednesday, Feb 19, 2014, 3,00 pm, Acclaimed Nepalese Poet to read at Marcus White Living Room, Central Connecticut State University, 1615 Stanley Street, New Britain, CT 06050 Hosted by Ravi Shankar, Free and open to the public, www.ccsu.edu, http://www.ccsu.edu/page.cfm?id=2272&verbose=63181&backcal=1

Ohio

Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014: 5:30 pm Yuyutsu Sharma Workshop: Writing Lakes, Mountains and Cities: A Himalayan Experience and Exercise at Mac’s Backs- Books on the Coventry, 1820 Coventry Rd Cleveland Heights, Ohio 44118, Registration $10.00 or $5.00 for students.; Please email info@macsbacks.com to register. Hosted by Suzanne DeGaetano, www.macsbacks.com, 216-321-2665
http://www.macsbacks.com/event/yuyutsu-sharma-workshop

Thursday, Feb 13 2014 11 am-12 pm : Yuyutsu Sharma’s The University of Akron Wayne College, SLB Marketplace, 1901 Smucker Road, Orrville, OH 44667 330-683-2010 http://wayne.uakron.edu/news-media/promo-detail.dot?promoId=4fbc78f5-f8ee-49c6-a04c-ecf82b4d2b12

Saturday, Feb 15, 2014: 7:00 pm Yuyutsu Sharma A Himalayan Poet in Akron, A Poetry Workshop at @ Rubber City Recording Studios & Polymer City Record Label & Promotions, 68 West Exchange St. Akron, OH 44308. Hosted by Jen Pezzo;The cost of this workshop: $15 per person, $10 per student followed by Open Mic costing $5 for those unable to attend the workshop. Please email jenpezzo@gmail.com to register, http://www.polymercityrecords.com/

Pennsylvania

Friday, Feb 14, 2014: 8:00 pm The New York City Poems from the Himalayan Poet,at Poet’s Hall– The International Fellowship of Poets and Spoken Word Artists 1136 E. Lake Rd, Erie, Pennsylvania Hosted by Cee Williams,
poet2thebone@gmail.com

ACCLAIMED POET YUYUTSU RD SHARMA PERFORMS AT Central Connecticut State University, ON 2/5

ACCLAIMED NEPALESE/INDIAN POET YUYUTSU RD SHARMA PERFORMS AT CCSU ON 2/5

Reads in Marcus White Living Room on the campus
of Central Connecticut State University, 1615 Stanley Street, New Britain, CT 06050
at 3 PM on Wednesday, Feb. 5th. Free and open to the public.

Yuyutsu Sharma, Nyc
Yuyutsu RD Sharma Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished poet and translator. He has published nine poetry collections including, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New Poems, (Nirala, New Delhi 2012), Nepal Trilogy, Photographs and Poetry on Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang (www.Nepal-Trilogy.de, Epsilonmedia, Karlsruhe, 2010), a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, (2009, Indian reprint 2014) and Annapurna Poems, 2008, Reprint, 2012).

Yuyutsu also brought out a translation of Irish poet Cathal O’ Searcaigh poetry in Nepali in a bilingual collection entitled, Kathmandu: Poems, Selected and New (2006) and a translation of Hebrew poet Ronny Someck’s poetry in Nepali in a bilingual edition, Baghdad, February 1991 & Other Poems. He has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English and launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry. Two books of his poetry, Poemes de l’ Himalayas (L’Harmattan, Paris) and Poemas de Los Himalayas (Cosmopoeticia, Cordoba, Spain) just appeared in French and Spanish respectively. Widely traveled author, he has read his works at several prestigious places including Poetry Café, London, Seamus Heaney Center for Poetry, Belfast, New York University, New York, The Kring, Amsterdam, P.E.N, Paris, Knox College, Illinois, Whittier College, California, Baruch College, New York, WB Yeats’ Center, Sligo, Gustav Stressemann Institute, Bonn, Rubin Museum, New York, Irish Writers’ Centre, Dublin, The Guardian Newsroom, London, Trois Rivieres Poetry Festival, Quebec, Arnofini, Bristol, Borders, London, Slovenian Book Days, Ljubljana, Royal Society of Dramatic Arts, London, Gunter Grass House, Bremen, GTZ, Kathmandu, Nehru Center, London, March Hare, Newfoundland, Canada, Gannon University, Erie, Frankfurt Book Fair, Frankfurt, Indian International Center, New Delhi, and Villa Serbelloni, Italy.

He has held workshop in creative writing and translation at Queen’s University, Belfast, University of Ottawa and South Asian Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany, University of California, Davis, Sacramento State University, California and New York University, New York. His works have appeared in Poetry Review, Chanrdrabhaga, Sodobnost, Amsterdam Weekly, Indian Literature, Irish Pages, Delo, Modern Poetry in Translation, Exiled Ink, Iton77, Little Magazine, The Telegraph, Indian Express and Asiaweek. The Library of Congress has nominated his recent book of Nepali translations entitled Roaring Recitals; Five Nepali Poets as Best Book of the Year 2001 from Asia under the Program, A World of Books International Perspectives.

Yuyutsu’s own work has been translated into German, French, Italian, Slovenian, Hebrew, Spanish and Dutch. He just published his nonfiction, Annapurnas & Stains of Blood: Life, Travel and Writing a Page of Snow, (Nirala, 2010). He edits Pratik, A Magazine of Contemporary Writing and contributes literary columns to Nepal’s leading daily, The Himalayan Times. He was at the Poetry Parnassus Festival organized to celebrate London Olympics 2012 where he represented Nepal and India. Currently, he is in New York as a Visiting Poet at New York University. Half the year, he travels and reads all over the world to read from his works and conducts creative writing workshop at various universities in North America and Europe but goes trekking in the Himalayas when back home.

More: www.yuyutsu.de, www.niralapublications.com

Please contact Ravi Shankar [ShankarR@ccsu.edu]; 860-832-2766 with questions.

Yuyutsu Sharma reading in Taos, New Mexico

Yuyutsu Sharma reading in New Mexico for the first time..

Taos reading
Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished poet and translator.

He has published nine poetry collections including, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New Poems, (Nirala, New Delhi 2012), Nepal Trilogy, Photographs and Poetry on Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang (www.Nepal-Trilogy.de, Epsilonmedia, Karlsruhe, 2010), a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, (2009, Indian reprint 2013) and Annapurna Poems, 2008, Reprint, 2012).
Yuyutsu also brought out a translation of Irish poet Cathal O’ Searcaigh poetry in Nepali in a bilingual collection entitled, Kathmandu: Poems, Selected and New (2006) and a translation of Hebrew poet Ronny Someck’s poetry in Nepali in a bilingual edition, Baghdad, February 1991 & Other Poems. He has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English and launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry.

Two books of his poetry, Poemes de l’ Himalayas (L’Harmattan, Paris) and Poemas de Los Himalayas (Cosmopoeticia, Cordoba, Spain) just appeared in French and Spanish respectively.

Widely traveled author, he has read his works at several prestigious places including Poetry Café, London, Seamus Heaney Center for Poetry, Belfast, New York University, New York, The Kring, Amsterdam, P.E.N, Paris, Knox College, Illinois, Whittier College, California, Baruch College, New York, WB Yeats’ Center, Sligo, Gustav Stressemann Institute, Bonn, Rubin Museum, New York, Irish Writers’ Centre, Dublin, The Guardian Newsroom, London, Trois Rivieres Poetry Festival, Quebec, Arnofini, Bristol, Borders, London, Slovenian Book Days, Ljubljana, Royal Society of Dramatic Arts, London, Gunter Grass House, Bremen, GTZ, Kathmandu, Nehru Center, London, March Hare, Newfoundland, Canada, Gannon University, Erie, Frankfurt Book Fair, Frankfurt, Indian International Center, New Delhi, and Villa Serbelloni, Italy.

He has held workshop in creative writing and translation at Queen’s University, Belfast, University of Ottawa and South Asian Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany, University of California, Davis, Sacramento State University, California and New York University, New York.

His works have appeared in Poetry Review, Chanrdrabhaga, Sodobnost, Amsterdam Weekly, Indian Literature, Irish Pages, Delo, Modern Poetry in Translation, Exiled Ink, Iton77, Little Magazine, The Telegraph, Indian Express and Asiaweek.

The Library of Congress has nominated his recent book of Nepali translations entitled Roaring Recitals; Five Nepali Poets as Best Book of the Year 2001 from Asia under the Program, A World of Books International Perspectives.

Yuyutsu’s own work has been translated into German, French, Italian, Slovenian, Hebrew, Spanish and Dutch. He just published his nonfiction, Annapurnas & Stains of Blood: Life, Travel and Writing a Page of Snow, (Nirala, 2010). He edits Pratik, A Magazine of Contemporary Writing and contributes literary columns to Nepal’s leading daily, The Himalayan Times.

He was at the Poetry Parnassus Festival organized to celebrate London Olympics 2012 where he represented Nepal and India.

Currently, he is in New York as a Visiting Poet at New York University.

Half the year, he travels and reads all over the world to read from his works and conducts creative writing workshop at various universities in North America and Europe but goes trekking in the Himalayas when back home.

More: www.yuyutsu.de, www.niralapublications.com

To the Highest Heavens: Poetry of Heights: New York City, The Himalayas, and Mars–Yuyutsu Ram Dass Sharma & David B. Austell

prelude
creek poems paper back

To the Highest Heavens:
Poetry of Heights: New York City, The Himalayas, and Mars
Yuyutsu Ram Dass Sharma & David B. Austell


A poetry reading at New York University
during
International Education Week 2013

Yuyutsu Sharma returns to New York City to read from his new book entitled Nine New York Poems: A Prelude to A Blizzard in My Bones: New York Poems (Nirala 2014)
David Austell will read from the New Revised Paperback edition of his much discussed Little Creek and Other Poems (Nirala, 2014). David will also read from his ambitious forthcoming book, The Tin Man,
to be published by Nirala later in 2014.

Thursday, November 21, 2013
Office of Global Services
516 LaGuardia Place
New York University
6:00pm

Directions: The Office of Global Services (OGS) is located at 561 LaGuardia Place at the corner of West 3rd Street and LaGuardia Place in Greenwich Village, Manhattan. OGS is directly behind the NYU Bobst Library, and is very close to Washington Square (South). Signage for OGS is visible from LaGuardia Place. Please enter thought the front entrance on the first floor. The building OGS is located in is Washington Square Village Building 1.

New York University
70 Washington Square South, New York, New York 10012
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David B. Austell

David B. Austell is Assistant Vice President and Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City, where he is also an Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School (adjunct). David has undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education. In 1992, David was a Fulbright grantee in Japan and Korea. The love of poetry grows from deep roots, and in David’s case from his parents: his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child.

Yuyutsu RD Sharma

Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished poet and translator.

He has published nine poetry collections including, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New Poems, (Nirala, New Delhi 2012), Nepal Trilogy, Photographs and Poetry on Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang (www.Nepal-Trilogy.de, Epsilonmedia, Karlsruhe, 2010), a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, (2009, Indian reprint 2014) and Annapurna Poems, 2008), Reprint, 2012, 14).

Yuyutsu has also brought out a translation of Irish poet Cathal O’ Searcaigh poetry in Nepali in a bilingual collection entitled, Kathmandu: Poems, Selected and New (2006) and a translation of Hebrew poet Ronny Someck’s poetry in Nepali in a bilingual edition, Baghdad, February 1991 & Other Poems. He has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English and launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry.

Two books of his poetry, Poemes de l’ Himalayas (L’Harmattan, Paris) and Poemas de Los Himalayas (Cosmopoeticia, Cordoba, Spain) have appeared in French and Spanish respectively.

Widely traveled author, he has read his works at several prestigious places including The Poetry Café, London, The Seamus Heaney Center for Poetry, Belfast, New York University, New York, The Kring, Amsterdam, P.E.N, Paris, Knox College, Illinois, Whittier College, California, Baruch College, New York, WB Yeats’ Center, Sligo, Gustav Stressemann Institute, Bonn, Rubin Museum, New York, Irish Writers’ Centre, Dublin, The Guardian Newsroom, London, Trois Rivieres Poetry Festival, Quebec, Arnofini, Bristol, Borders, London, Slovenian Book Days, Ljubljana, Royal Society of Dramatic Arts, London, Gunter Grass House, Bremen, Nehru Center, London, March Hare, Newfoundland, Canada, South Bank Center, London, Gannon University, Erie, Frankfurt Book Fair, Frankfurt, Indian International Center, New Delhi, and Villa Serbelloni, Italy.

He has held workshops in creative writing and translation at Queen’s University, Belfast, University of Ottawa and South Asian Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany, University of California, Davis, Sacramento State University, California and New York University, New York.

Yuyutsu’s own work has been translated into German, French, Italian, Slovenian, Hebrew, Spanish and Dutch. He has also published his non-fiction, Annapurnas & Stains of Blood: Life, Travel and Writing a Page of Snow and edits Pratik, A Magazine of Contemporary Writing. He contributes literary columns to Nepal’s leading daily, The Himalayan Times.

Yuyutsu was at the Poetry Parnassus Festival organized to celebrate London Olympics 2012 where he represented Nepal and India. He will visit NYU later this year as Special Visiting Poet and in 2014, Nicaragua as Guest Poet to participate in International Poetry Festival of Granada.

Half the year, he travels and reads all over the world from his works and conducts creative writing workshop at various universities in North America and Europe but goes trekking in the Himalayas when back home.