Leading Indian Daily, The Hindu’s short review of Yuyutsu Sharma’ “A Blizzard in my Bones: New York Poems

Leading Indian Daily, The Hindu’s short review of Yuyutsu Sharma’ “A Blizzard in my Bones: New York Poems
http://www.thehindu.com/books/Reading-Room/article17193166.ece
“A collection of poems about the ‘world’s first city’ by a Himalayan poet, the book, explores Yuyutsu Sharma’s transformation into a New Yorker. It speaks of colliding cultures, of an artist whose fate it is to wander, and a tender but triumphant vision of a metropolis that belongs to all the world’s people.”
–The Hindu
a blizzard-final - Copy - Copy

Leading American Magazine Drunken Boat’s 24th Issue with Special Himalayan Arts Folio edited by Yuyutsu Sharma released

http://www.drunkenboat.com/db24

Annapurna Note News

America’s leading online magazine, Drunken Boat launches Folio feature on Nepalese poetry and arts

http://www.annapurnapost.com/annanote/news/1563/America%E2%80%99s-leading-online-magazine,-Drunken-Boat-launches-Folio-feature-on-Nepalese-poetry-and-arts

KATHMANDU – Drunken Boat, America’s oldest online magazine is going to publish its 24th issue with a special focus on Nepal and Himalayan Arts. The poems are edited and translated by world renowned Himalayan poet Yuyutsu R.D. Sharma. The issue will include 35 poets and select artists from Nepal.

village-women-by-hari-thapa

Evoking the spirit of New Nepal and themes of love, war and hunger, the folio ranges from older generations poet Gopal Prasad Rimal, Krishan Bhakta Shrestha Bhupi Sherchan, Bimal Nibha, Shailendra Sakar, Purna Viram, Shyamal, Hari Adhikary, Yuyutsu Sharma along with younger generation poets like Buddhi Sagar Chepain, Chunky Shrestha, Padma Gautam, Keshab Silwal, Arun Budhathoki and Promod Snehi. Also, works of Shashi Shah, Hari Khadka, Ragni Upadhyaya, Kiran Manansdhar and Niresh Sainju and others have been featured.

The issue also includes Yuyutsu Sharma’s exhaustive introduction “A Quiet Space for Poetry in Nepal.” outlining the Nepali poetry’s history and its current scenario.

The literary giant is also planning to bring the issue in a book format with some additional translations from Yuyutsu Sharma later along with a Special section on Nepalese woman poets.

It is the first time ever in the history of Nepali literature that a foreign publisher is publishing the works from the Himalayan nation. Most importantly, the issue also focuses on Himalayan arts.

In words of Drunken Boat Editor, Erica Mena, “It’s a gorgeous issue, full of some of the best work I’ve seen in our pages.”

http://www.annapurnapost.com/annanote/news/1563/America%E2%80%99s-leading-online-magazine,-Drunken-Boat-launches-Folio-feature-on-Nepalese-poetry-and-arts

 

Pocket Edition of Yuyutsu Sharma and Andreas Stimm’s Nepal Trilogy out!

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Nepal Trilogy Selection – Poems and pictures

EXPLORE & REMEMBER NEPAL
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang – Selected Edition 2015- with Map & Postcard!

Poems by Yuyutsu R. D. Sharma
Hasselblad Photographs by Andreas Stimm

Photographs and Poetry about the Nepal areas of Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang. A Hasselblad-XPan documentary coffee-table book.

Hardcover, 200 pages, over 100 panoramic photographs, 15 poems, extra map: Everest & Annapurna (42 cm x 60 cm).

“To do justice to the landscapes and peoples of the highest mountains in the world requires a sensitivity and skill not given to all of us. Andreas Stimm and Yuyutsu R. D. Sharma have succeeded, in this trilogy of photographs and poems, in bringing to life an extraordinary region in all its striking beauty and natural harmony. The unique combination of their photographic and poetic skills succeeds in laying bare the very soul of the Himalayas, the smiling warmth of its inhabitants and its dramatically beautiful peaks and valleys. Each page transports you to a magical and timeless world which, alas, is condemned slowly to disappear as modernization, new roads, and environmental degradation combine to depopulate these remote areas.”

His Excellency Mr. Keith George Bloomfield

Former British Ambassador to Nepal
Visit: http://www.explore.nepal-trilogy.de/

Yuyutsu Sharma to read with David Austell at the Rubin Museum

Friday, Feb 7, 2014, 6:00-8:30 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma and David Austell, guests of the Rubin Museum of Art’s Himalayan Heritage Meetup Group, Theme: Love Poetry of the 6th Dalai Lama, Hosted by Tashi Chodron, Rubin Museum, 150 W 17th St, New York, www.rmanyc.org. Phone: (212) 620-5000. Free and open to public.
Meet in the Museum’s café at 6:00 pm.

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We are excited to invite you to the next session of the Himalayan Heritage Meet up group on Friday, February 7, from 6-8:30PM. This month, in honor of Valentine’s Day, we are inspired by the love poetry of the famous 6th Dalai Lama. Tsangyang Gyatso! We will meet in the Museum’s Serai Café at 6PM, then head to the galleries where we will explore some images and listen to poetry written by this unusual figure with our host, Tashi Chodron.

This month, we have the great opportunity to welcome two distinguished guest poets, Yuyutsu Sharma and David Austell from NYU. After our gallery experience, we will move to our Education Center where Yuyutsu Sharma will read from his book, Milarepa’s Bones, Helambu: 33 New Poems and David Austell will read from his new book. Garuda and Other Poems of Astral Plains accompanied by music and images. Afterwards we will all learn the melody to one of the 6th Dalai Lama’s renowned poems and socialize with some Valentine’s Day themed refreshments.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Date: Friday, February 7
Time: Meet in museum Café at 6:00. We move to the education Center at 6:45.

YUYU-DAVID

David B. Austell
David B. Austell is Assistant Vice President and Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City, where he is also an Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School (adjunct). David has undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education. In 1992, David was a Fulbright grantee in Japan and Korea. The love of poetry grows from deep roots, and in David’s case from his parents: his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child.

Yuyutsu RD Sharma
Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished poet and translator. He has published nine poetry collections including, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New Poems, (Nirala, New Delhi 2012), Nepal Trilogy, Photographs and Poetry on Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang (www.Nepal-Trilogy.de, Epsilonmedia, Karlsruhe, 2010), a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America, (2009, Indian reprint 2013) and Annapurna Poems, 2008, Reprint, 2012).
Yuyutsu also brought out a translation of Irish poet Cathal O’ Searcaigh poetry in Nepali in a bilingual collection entitled, Kathmandu: Poems, Selected and New (2006) and a translation of Hebrew poet Ronny Someck’s poetry in Nepali in a bilingual edition, Baghdad, February 1991 & Other Poems. He has translated and edited several anthologies of contemporary Nepali poetry in English and launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry.

More about the poets can be had at www.niralapublications.com

EL AL: Streets of Manhattan: Yuyutsu Sharma’s Column on New York City

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Streets of Manhattan
Musings on New York’s ability to embrace all
Added At: 2013-09-28 10:46 PM Last Updated At: 2013-09-28 10:46 PM

Fifth Avenue

YUYUTSU RD SHARMA
KATHMANDU:

Your name

like your yogurt kisses

I long to forget

in the boulevards of NYC’s

alphabet avenues

Your kisses

like your cherry mouth

sings Starbucks songs

of winds stirred by flames

of freedom.

(Your Name, A Blizzard in my Bones)

“There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless,” says Simone Beauvoir about the vital bustle the mega city. For over a year, I have been working on the manuscript of my New York poems, entitled, A Blizzard in My Bones. The very energy of the city is electrifying in a special way, making you go back to it, and walk its bistros, boulevards and shores, even when you are away, far, far away.

The first time I went there, I had fortune of living in Greenwich Village where legendary John Lennon “regretted profoundly” that he “was not born in”.

Back home as the Kathmandu Valley rivers swelled from incessant monsoons, I have been walking the suburbs, working long hours in small tea shops over my notes on this city of cities where, in words of Groucho Marx, “Practically everybody … has half a mind to write a book — and does.”

In the winter of 2012, I also had the leisure of walking the numbered streets of Manhattan with my manuscript in mind, hanging out with fellow poets, spending time in art places, libraries and spacious bookstores. Often, I went to share my works at local NYC poetry venues, and read almost everything I could lay my hands on —memoirs, poetry, stories, reports along with all time favourites like Catcher in the Rye, The Great Gatsby, Lunch Poems, even recent books on the city, including, Salman Rushdie’s Fury and Deborah Landau’s The Last Usable Hour.

One of the first few books I had read about the city remains Maxim Gorky’s The City of the Yellow Demon. The book had clouded my vision of the city for a long time. Gorky sees New York as a bleak underworld without a glint of happiness, a working class hell. However, landing in New York, I was amazed to find a very different world. What I saw was not a dreary dungeon, but as Salvador Dali pointed out “an Egypt turned inside out. For she erected pyramids of slavery to death, and you erect pyramids of democracy with the vertical organ-pipes of your skyscrapers all meeting at the point of infinity of liberty!”

Another crucial book I found by chance in a Greenwich Village cafe was Federico Garcia Lorca’s Poet in New York City. Again, I had difficulty in dealing with Lorca’s surreal accounts the city emptied of any spirituality, “a city that doesn’t sleep”. Lorca presents the metropolis as a brutal place where every day “they slaughter/four million ducks,/five million hogs,/two thousand pigeons to accommodate the tastes of the dying,/one million cows,/one million lambs,/and two million roosters/that smash the sky to pieces”.

Could I too write on this city in a similar vein? Just because it is customary for poets to be critical of the cities and civilisations? Shall I lash the city that has become a refuge for million nationalities from every corner of the world, including the American people from every State?

Over the years, my stay in New York City had given me different impressions. While working on my take on it, I could see how today the Cold War bias was uncalled for, almost irrational. I could not but celebrate this glorious city’s status as previously I had celebrated the Himalayas. The Himalayas are nature-made and New York man-made, humanity’s triumph. For that is what hopefully in the coming decades humanity would turn into, if it evolves from tribal, narrow visions.
Nyc cityscape
“Make your mark in New York,” wrote Mark Twain, “and you are a made man.” Last year I reached the city a week before the Hurricane Sandy hit the West Coast and a month before notorious New Town massacre. I had expected the worst, the whole island upside down, civilian life disrupted. Due to nasty road expansion work and chaos in my own Himalayan metropolis, I had sore memories seething in my mind. Due to the hurricane, my NYU assignments were postponed for a couple of weeks and I had to prolong my stopover in London.

After a fortnight as I reached the city, I found everything in order. Eager, I looked for the signs the calamity might have caused. Like a child, I ran in the spacious streets of Manhattan and took E Train to Brooklyn. All I got was some stray narratives of the Sandy-hit areas in few poetry readings. So quickly, the Sandy catastrophe had turned into a thing of the past. People talked how there was no electricity for a few days and one of my poet friends said she had to go all the way to affluent Uptown to get a hot cup of coffee.

On my way back on subway past midnight, I went laughing all the way. I had left the Valley where 18 hours of power-cuts has become a norm. Our children have grown up groping in the darkness of a republic-in-the-making that has not been able to find a focus. They have become used to the drone of maddening power generators and the clouds of dusts of hovering over the streets ripped apart and left bleeding like permanent wounds. Day to day civilian suffering along with rampant corruption has left a permanent scar on the face of Nepali polity.

Of course, you expect quick action from a First World nation, one could argue, and there’s nothing to be surprised if things had come back to normal. That’s not the only reason that makes you celebrate the city of the blazing skyline. New York is a place where humanity has evolved. No matter where you come from, you are welcomed there the morning you arrive. All you have to do is imbibe the free spirit of a New Yorker. “One belongs to New York instantly,” discerns Tom Wolfe, “one belongs to it as much in five minutes as in five years.”

To the rest of the world, it might seem different. If ever the humanity evolves into a place of ultimate coexistence, that’s what it would look like, a New York. What to talk of Europe and Americas, we know how in our own subcontinent, in cities like Kathmandu, Mumbai or New Delhi, in the inner circles the outsiders are looked upon with suspicion and distrust. Our cities have a long history of ostracising and humiliating outsiders. The literatures in vernacular languages of the subcontinent are full of such tribal assaults of our so-called “barbarous civilisations”. That’s why one wonders, wasn’t it along such lines of logic Walt Whitman had to shout, “Give me such shows — give me the streets of Manhattan!”

Your smile

like your bright eyes

stays calm as stars

over blue Atlantic waters.

Your eyes

like your dolphin heart

beats frantic

in the numbered streets

of Manhattan.

Your heart mind

reading horoscopes

of my life’s withered leaf

aflutter in the dark streets

of your city.

(Your Name, A Blizzard in my Bones)

(The writer can be reached at yuyutsurd@yahoo.com)
NEW yORK

Distinguished Poet David Austell to read at Jani Rose Gallery, Summit, NY

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A Reading from
TIN MAN
& Other Poems
By David B Austell
March 7th
Thurseday,
at Jani Rose Gallery
MONDO Summit – 426 Springfield Avenue, Summit, NJ
6-9 pm Thursday, March 7
Microsoft Word - THE TIN MAN POSTER FOR READING AT MONDO SUMMIT
Distinguished American Poet shall read from his new book due out in 2014!
He shall also sign copies of his previously published book, Garuda and Little Creek

DR. DAVID B. AUSTELL (United States) grew up in the southern part of the United States during the 1950s and 1960s, his love of poetry growing from deep roots: from his mother who sent poetry, sacred and secular, to him all through college with her letters, and from his father who read Shakespeare and Coleridge to him as a child. He completed undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education. He has undergraduate and graduate degrees in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he also completed his Ph.D. in Higher Education focusing on International Education (his dissertation, The Birds in the Rich Forest, concerned Chinese students in the United States during the Student Democracy Movement). In 1992, he was a Fulbright grantee in Korea and Japan. He is currently the Executive Director of the Office of Global Services at New York University in New York City where he is also an adjunct Associate Professor of International Education in the NYU Steinhardt School His first book of poetry, Little Creek, was published in January 2011 by Nirala Press, and his second volume, Garuda (also published by Nirala), was released in March 2012. David’s poetry has also appeared in Infusion Magazine, and in The Rutherford Red Wheelbarrow.