Leading American Magazine Drunken Boat’s 24th Issue with Special Himalayan Arts Folio edited by Yuyutsu Sharma released

http://www.drunkenboat.com/db24

Annapurna Note News

America’s leading online magazine, Drunken Boat launches Folio feature on Nepalese poetry and arts

http://www.annapurnapost.com/annanote/news/1563/America%E2%80%99s-leading-online-magazine,-Drunken-Boat-launches-Folio-feature-on-Nepalese-poetry-and-arts

KATHMANDU – Drunken Boat, America’s oldest online magazine is going to publish its 24th issue with a special focus on Nepal and Himalayan Arts. The poems are edited and translated by world renowned Himalayan poet Yuyutsu R.D. Sharma. The issue will include 35 poets and select artists from Nepal.

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Evoking the spirit of New Nepal and themes of love, war and hunger, the folio ranges from older generations poet Gopal Prasad Rimal, Krishan Bhakta Shrestha Bhupi Sherchan, Bimal Nibha, Shailendra Sakar, Purna Viram, Shyamal, Hari Adhikary, Yuyutsu Sharma along with younger generation poets like Buddhi Sagar Chepain, Chunky Shrestha, Padma Gautam, Keshab Silwal, Arun Budhathoki and Promod Snehi. Also, works of Shashi Shah, Hari Khadka, Ragni Upadhyaya, Kiran Manansdhar and Niresh Sainju and others have been featured.

The issue also includes Yuyutsu Sharma’s exhaustive introduction “A Quiet Space for Poetry in Nepal.” outlining the Nepali poetry’s history and its current scenario.

The literary giant is also planning to bring the issue in a book format with some additional translations from Yuyutsu Sharma later along with a Special section on Nepalese woman poets.

It is the first time ever in the history of Nepali literature that a foreign publisher is publishing the works from the Himalayan nation. Most importantly, the issue also focuses on Himalayan arts.

In words of Drunken Boat Editor, Erica Mena, “It’s a gorgeous issue, full of some of the best work I’ve seen in our pages.”

http://www.annapurnapost.com/annanote/news/1563/America%E2%80%99s-leading-online-magazine,-Drunken-Boat-launches-Folio-feature-on-Nepalese-poetry-and-arts

 

Nirala to release distinguished American poet and playwright Irene O’ Garden’s “Fulcrum: Selected Poems in December 2016

fulcrum-for-print

 

Fulcrum: Selected Poems

by Irene O’ Garden

ISBN 9-788182-500860  pp.90 2017 Hardcover Demy

 

Praise for Irene O’Garden’s Work

Sparkling musicality, deep emotion and discerning reflection distinguish O’ Garden’s poems. Here is a fine intelligence at work—and at play—revealing a tonic perspective in a range of poetic expression, including lyric, narrative and her own innovative “fulcrum” forms. Her close observation and sensual delight in language make “Fulcrum” an experience both grounding and uplifting.

“Bewitching…astounding…heartbreaking” — New York Times

“For many years now, the poet, playwright, and memoirist Irene O’Garden has been a hero to me. I think of her as a walking, writing, beam of light… numberless others will come to know her gifts and, most of all, her captivating talent for wonder and marvel.”

Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love

“Lush imagery…poetry set to the life cycle of nature.”

–Kirkus Reviews

 

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Distinguished American poet and playwright, Irene O’ Garden’s poetry has found its way to stage, e-screen, hardcover, literary magazines, anthologies and now, her first collection. Her critically acclaimed play Women On Fire, (Samuel French) played sold-out houses at Off-Broadway at the Cherry Lane Theatre and was nominated for a Lucille Lortel Award. O’Garden won a Pushcart Prize for her lyric essay “Glad To Be Human,” (Untreed Reads) Harper published her memoir Fat Girl (Untreed Reads, e-form) and her poems and essays have been featured in dozens of literary journals and anthologies. O’ Garden founded The Art Garden, a performing literary magazine which she produced and hosted for twenty-five years. She now contributes to the spoken word event 650-Where Writers Read, in New York City and Sarah Lawrence College. Irene is also a Poetry Educator with the Hudson Highlands chapter of the national River Of Words program, connecting children to nature via poetry and art.

Praise for Irene O’Garden’s Fulcrum.

Fulcrum is a stunning assessment of human life on the planet, a requiem of the mutant seasons when ‘wind steals/the juices from our eyes/our land cracks open / with an unrequited love ‘and ‘our mountains are on fire.’

Experimental, theatrical and engaging, these poems are like molten lava of our minds, ‘a single stinging tear,’ a howl of every heart, a garland of ‘offered images’ on the altar of life,  ‘funeral of funerals themselves,’ and a song of  ‘American shame (that) brings us to our knees.’

This is a newer version of The Waste Land, a metaphoric pyramid of natural elements whose admirations ‘blooms like fruit,’ a casebook of the wounds of life and the wisdom you draw out of them. Like splinter of a stone that the poet once stepped on never came out, the poems once read will become part of you and help you ‘know the knowing that we know.’

–Yuyutsu Sharma, Himalayan Poet, author of Quaking Cantos; Nepal Earthquake Poems and A Blizzard in my Bones: New York Poems

The poems in Irene O’Garden’s new book, Fulcrum, illustrate the importance and vitality of poetry in our daily lives.  Beautiful imagery, powerful emotions, simplicity, complexity and thought provoking subjects – all drawn from relatable life experiences – make reading her work a journey of discovery and reflection by focusing on what it means to live a life of passion and wonderment.   Like the author herself, the poems in these pages inspire and draw one in. This is a beautiful collection.  

Professor Jane Kinney-Denning of Pace University, President of Women’s National Book Association

Somewhere between Wordsworth and Dylan Thomas but soaring on her own wings, Irene O’Garden flies high, taking language to new strata with effortless-appearing dips and ascents which made me gasp. Every line could be a poem in itself. I often thought of the “green fuse of life” as nature and color combine in indescribable but absolutely recognizable ways.”

—Laura Shaine Cunningham, best-selling memoirist (Sleeping Arrangements and A Place in the Country) and frequent NY Times contributor.

An immersion into what we relish, how we live, a kind of shining beacon that doesn’t shy away from the tough stuff…Highly recommended.

Janet Pierson, Producer SXSW Film Conference and Festival

In a far-ranging and elegant suite of poems, Irene O’Garden balances a galaxy of incommensurates on the fulcrum of a disciplined intelligence. “I am a blueprint of Herbert-like sacred meditation, the latter in a narrative about being chased by a bull. Her technique suggests influences ranging from Donne to Bishop, from Frost to Moore. Soulful and rewarding, these poems remind us that “We’re not made of matter but of mattering.”

—T.R. Hummer, whose poems appear in The New Yorker, Best of American Poetry, Harper’s, Atlantic Monthly, Paris Review, and twelve volumes of his own.

Having delighted in and been enlightened by Irene’s eloquent human poetics for over two decades, I was kind of shocked when she told me this was her first published poetry collection. I couldn’t quite believe it. Then I checked all her warmly gifted and gratefully shared titles on my bookshelf and yes, indeed, this was her first poetry collection.

And thus, Fulcrum, where we all balance and “blossom like a love-mussed bed.” Like “a wound in the noon of a life.” Language hinging on voice. Voice on the cyclone currents of our aches and pains. Our joy and promise. The realization that “I sing a thanking song.” And “caress creation’s verbs.”

– – Mike Jurkovic, curmudgeon poet, VP, Calling All Poets

“At the Inkwell Magazine Review of “A Blizzard in my Bones”” and “Quaking Cantos” by Benjamin Schmitt

The Inner and Outer Journeys of Yuyutsu Sharma

http://attheinkwell.com/the-inner-and-outer-journeys-of-yuyutsu-sharma/

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“In the cracks/of debased glaciers shine/the beguiled stars/of our twisted galaxies.”

I must confess that I read these books out of order, or at least not in the order that I recommend for other readers. Both of these books were released in the last year and one is actually quite long for a book of poems, at 173 pages. This is an enormous output for a contemporary poet, a cursory polling of my bookshelf reveals most of my poetry collections to be in the 70-page range, and some poets can spend up to a decade polishing a collection. I see these two books by Yuyutsu Sharma, A Blizzard in my Bones and Quaking Cantos, as a depiction of a journey more akin to sagas in lengthier tomes such as Dante’s descent into the Infernoor Milton’s description of a Paradise Lost than as typical volumes of modern lyric verse. Strangely, it is the poet’s journey to a foreign land that initiates inner searching and the poet’s return home that prompts outer travels to seek healing with brethren.

My recommendation for readers is to begin with A Blizzard in my Bones. It is the longer of the pair, but it is a good entry point as I believe this to be the beginning of the journey. In the initial cycle of the book, “Asleep Like…”, a black shape pours forth from the narrator’s grandmother “its flame/burning the walls/of her throat.” It is the search for this black shape that prompts the narrator’s journey to New York City. Soon he is entering “a Babylon/of wandering winter spirits/and wavering speeches” in which he experiences “the Subway’s odor/tingling the lonely/walks to Washington Square.”

While there are many discoveries inside New York City that take place in the book, the narrator’s self-discoveries are the most compelling. He once again sees the black shape, this time “a black bird like Anne Sexton” in “Luna, Fish on Long Island Sound”, a poem about discovering oneself in love. In “The Aging Translator of Mallarme” he explores how others see him. Through the Ginsbergian howl “The Scream, Subway Avatars” the poet begins to find himself in the city, particularly in the grimy dark. A process completed in “Your Name” as the narrator describes a tongue that “licks sadness/out of my life’s numbered streets” thus melding himself with the cityscape. The book does not end with this immersion though, eventually the poet leaves New York to return home with the strength of the city.

Nepal in the aftermath of horrific earthquakes is the setting of Quaking Cantos. Just like the black shape fleeing his grandmother prompted the journey inward, it is this tragedy that moves the poet towards the suffering Nepali people. Quaking Cantos is my favorite of the two books because it allows the poet to display the kind of compassionate craftsmanship such a subject demands. The most stunning accomplishment of this book is the poet’s ability to use short lines to convey the physical and emotional devastation in the wake of a natural disaster. Here is an example of this from the poem “Nipple”:

“a baby crawls

on the cold

chest

of earth

looking for

his dead

mother’s

nipple.”

The short lines slow down the tempo of the poem so much that the reader almost feels as if they are crawling with the baby through the rubble. In poems like “Bhaktupar” and “Sunya” the abrupt lines create the very effect of the debris they describe, an accumulation of unexpected objects lying on top of one another and sometimes mixing together. Sharma is gifted at an enjambment that reflects the destruction of the scene, evident in the poem “Course of Courage” which describes “buildings about to tumble/into the grand jaw of Time.”

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In his outward journey, the narrator often fixes his gaze on the NGOs that have descended onto his country in the wake of this crisis. Throughout the book, he amusingly calls such organizations “Compassion Inc.” In “Quake Relief” a lamb starves under a sign in which an NGO is seeking blood from donors. The stark imagery of an animal suffering under such an appeal raises legitimate questions about the abilities and methods of these organizations, particularly their blindness to the everyday life of the Nepali people. InQuaking Cantos, Sharma brings this life to the epicenter of his collection, creating “a song/of human lives/crackling.”

In A Blizzard in my Bones the narrator begins picking up the inner wreckage of his life. It is only through this process that he is able to confront the outer wreckage ofQuaking Cantos and raise up the lives of the Nepali people. This is not a perfect journey, there were some sections in both books that could have been truncated and others that could have gone deeper. If you only have the time or budget for one of these books, I recommend Quaking Cantos, though both of them stand on their own. Regardless, Yuyutsu Sharma is an essential voice whose inner and outer struggles are worth chronicling. I am glad to have spent some time traveling with him, and I think you will be as well.


Benjamin SchmittBenjamin Schmitt is the Best Book Award and Pushcart nominated author of two books,Dinner Table Refuge (PunksWritePoemsPress, 2015) andThe global conspiracy to get you in bed (Kelsay Books, 2013). His poetry has appeared in Sakura Review, Hobart, Grist, Wisconsin Review, Two Thirds North and elsewhere. He lives with his wife and daughter in Seattle where he also reviews books, curates At The Inkwell’s Seattle reading series, and teaches workshops to people of all ages. Learn more at http://bens25.tumblr.com/

Nirala to launch American poet Karen Corinne Herceg’s Out From Calaboose: New Poems in November

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Out of Calaboose :New Poems

Karen Corinne Herceg

ISBN 9-788182-500853  pp.91 2017 Paper Demy

American poet Karen Corinne Herceg graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University with a B.A. in Literature & Writing and has graduate credits in editing, revision and psychology.  A recipient of N.Y. State grants, she has featured at major venues such as The N.Y. Public Library, The Queens Museum, The Province town Playhouse, St. John’s University, Binghamton University and many others with such renowned poets as Pulitzer Prize winners John Ashbery and Philip Schultz and poet William Packard, founder of The New York Quarterly. She has studied with David Ignatow, Philip Schultz and writer/novelist Glenda Adams. Karen was co-founder and editor of The First East Coast Theatre & Publishing Company which published poetry by Anna Adams, Stuart Kaufman, Roger Steigmeier and a novel by Charles Powers.

Her first volume of poems is Inner Sanctions. She publishes poetry, prose and essays in a variety of magazines and literary journals. Karen’s most recent publications include Antioch University’s Lunch Ticket Journal, The Avalon Literary Review, MockingHeart Review, Badlands, The Furious Gazelle, Reminisce—a publication of Readers Digest– and several publications in the U.K. Her work is read on various radio broadcasts, and she has been interviewed by The Epoch Times. Karen is currently working with Khalilah Ali, writing her memoirs as the former wife of the legendary Muhammad Ali.

Karen is a member of Poets & Writers, Writers Digest, the Academy of American Poets, PEN America, The Poetry Society of America and C.A.P.S. and is a featured poet on the New York poetry scene. Her website is: www.karencorinneherceg.com and you can also follow her on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Clutching her vision firmly in hand, Karen Corinne Herceg paints her inner world in such a vivid fashion that I was compelled to submerge myself in Out From Calaboose completely, and then not surface at all until I put down the last poem. What I wove through during the course of that reading was a feast: imagery fine enough that it startled; rhythms that wove from poem to poem, joining all their music together; and language so sleek that not one word had been left standing if it ought not to be. In this collection, Herceg brings us her life and all its many emotional truths, some ugly, some beautiful, but all revealed with restraint–so that by book’s end, we are left in wonder. 

–Linda Gray Sexton, author of Searching for Mercy Street: My Journey Back To My Mother, Anne Sexton and Half in Love: Surviving the Legacy of Suicide

In Out from Calaboose, Karen Corinne Herceg traces what one might call a karmic trajectory from oppressive relationships in adult life back to a controlling or absent parent whose chiseled stone dates leave “impressions in her flesh.” And, after that, to a freeing.

Roberta Gould in the Foreword

Herceg is a grand ‘maker’ in our Eastern tradition, an emergence of a fresh American voice that pulls out of her past a dark abyss of time, ‘herding children, objects and desires’ and brings along her story with a ‘feline intensity,’ very much like her cats, never looking hurt, ‘just indignant.’ Here are poems racing against the chill of time and treacherous tides that have washed away years of a young woman who stands now at the threshold of life with ‘her grocery bags’ and sings songs of the new, her new hope in ‘greens and fruits’ tethered to ‘a grassy firmament,’ birthing through ‘a placenta of debts’, cutting umbilical cords, dragging herself throughthe mire of inherited sins in a ‘maternal bloodbath,’ a place where her parents rest in sullen ‘drawers of steel.’ This is a remarkable work, a Virginia Woolf moment stretched into a book of poems, or a Whitman rumination that refuses to come to an end, enamored as it is by life’s ongoing rush. Out from Calaboose affirms Herceg’s faith in a poet’s visionary status as she imagines her hand reaching toward, snapping through ‘embryonic clay’ and sculpting lives that could become whole…

–Yuyutsu Sharma, Himalayan Poet & author of Quaking Cantos: Nepal Earthquake Poems and A Blizzard in my Bones: New York Poems

Often it is a pronounced sense of wonder that makes poets like Karen Corinne Herceg.  In her volume, she is Alice in her Wonderland, a curious child asking Why? Why? Why?  Why are “our impatient lives [spent] in fluorescent lit aisles”?  Why can a mother only offer “left over hippie love before the dusk of empty bottles”?  Why is it that “time chimes clocks as if we were a gift”?  And why do we [keep] “kicking [ourselves] back onto the cross, always just shy of redemption”?  When a child asks Why, she expects a truthful answer.  So does Herceg.  She wants to get to the bottom of just why we break out of our birth shells so passionately, with biting egg teeth, only to construct invisible shields, brick and mortar walls and personal calabooses that separate us from each other.  What drives us?  What forces impose themselves on us?  The poems in Out From Calaboose compile a quest for truthful answers, one of which Herceg instinctively knows when she quotes  Carl Sagan at the beginning of her poem “Alternatives” – for small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.

Janet Hamill, American poet, author of Body of Water

In her powerful new volume, Out from Calaboose, Karen Herceg clearly demonstrates the loneliness and wonder of a “world scaled for living”(from “Tableau”). Herceg’s is a world fueled by travel, whether it is global wanderings or the travelings of a troubled spirit seeking rest or resolution: “Will anything stave off this thing/called salvation–/how if we pine and ponder enough/somehow we will deserve explanations” (from “After Me, The Poem”). Her verse can often be troubling, as when she describes the transparent boundaries separating creatures from nature (the immolation of birds as they hit pane glass, a sacrifice to hubris); culture from culture; people from each other; and humans from nature: “tree bark flakes/plants wither/glaciers melt and slide/and we watch it on monitors” (from “Corporate Menu”). Once she has her reader thus in thrall, the poet ups the ante in positing a world fueled by despairing travail and the imminence of death: “Can we only be saved in loss?” (from “Epithalamium”). But then it becomes evident that the poet has a different world-view in mind when she juxtaposes such darkness with the idealism of her elegant and touchingHudson History:Honoring Pete Seeger” in which she infers the redemptive power of hopefulness, of what the world might be, stemming from a new vision. Out from Calaboose is a marvelous, skillful, and evocative work.

Dr. David B. Austell, Columbia University

 Herceg’s poetry has honesty and a sane, healing quality.  As a poet she fulfills one of the most crucial needs of our troubled age: Truth-seeking.  There’s no pretense in Herceg’s approach.”

Robert Milby, Poet & Hudson Valley, NY Poetry Series Host

Paperback Edition of Rishikeshab Raj Regmi’s The Dhimals: Miraculous Migrants of Himal

 

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The Dhimals: Miraculous Migrants of Himal: An Anthropological Study of a Nepalese Ethnic Group

ISBN 9788182500082 2016 PP 294 Rs. 295 Free Shipping in India and Nepal

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001EASOWQ

http://www.amazon.in/dp/8182500087

Dr . Rishikeshab Raj Regmi is a prominent Nepalese anthropologist.

The Dhimals : Miraculous Migrants of Himal captures the mechanism of an agrarian Nepalese ethnic group caught in the crossfire of tradition and modernization. Dr. Regmi, for the first time, attempts to analyze the society of the Dhimals in a purely anthropological perspective. Describing all around socio- cultural facets of the Dhimals society, Dr. Regmi endeavors to study and determine how certain demographic, ecological and social changes are interacting with the traditional setting in the Jhapa district of Eastern Nepal Terai to alter its basic social structure and cultural traits. Dr. Regmi adopts a systematic development approach and places emphasis on the relevance of economy, occupational variables to the social structure of the Dhimal families.

The book is an authentic account of the little known migrants of Himal who are attempting to adjust the pressures of modernization without letting their traditional value system collapse.

“The well-known Nepalese scholar and anthropologist, Dr. Rishikeshab Raj Regmi has vividly analyzed the entire socio-cultural structure of the fast changing society of Dhimals of the Nepal Terai . His study with an anthropological perspective widely covers the theme he has undertake for his scholarly pursuit and shows how custom and tradition influences behavior, economy, polity and how developing societies are adjusting themselves to the influence of modernization.”

Dr. Ishwar Baral Former Vice-Chancellor, Nepal Academy, Kathmandu

Nirala to launch distinguished American Poet David B. Axelrod’s “All Vows: New & Selected Poems” in August

 

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All Vows: New & Selected Poems

David B. Axelrod

ISBN 978-8182500822 2016 pp 194

Cover and artwork by Jessica Robinson

All Vows: New & Selected Poems is the most thorough selection from most vibrant contemporary American voice, David B. Axelrod. Result of his forty-plus years as a professional poet, the book is  divided almost equally between new work and poems going back to his first book published in 1968. However, the contents are arranged thematically rather than chronologically including poems dealing with family, nature, sports; poems about prejudice and politics; covering a host of topics ranging from the sacred to the profane.

Current Volusia County, Florida, Poet Laureate, Axelrod writes in direct but clever language—more witty than metaphoric. A poem entitled “Sun Worship,” that recounts the warnings of his dermatologist, ends with the lament, “No one can tell me Vitamin D stands for death.”

 

David with gold medal

Celebrated American poet, editor and anthologist, X. J. Kennedy, commenting on a previous Axelrod collection, said, “For all the artfulness of his poems, there is something unliterary about them—that is, they don’t smell of the scholar’s lamp, they seem at times to have turned up in the Lost & Found department of a hotel in Long Island City.”

That easy artfulness is reflected in the comments of Florida’s State Poet Laureate, Peter Meinke: “Many of us have been reading David B. Axelrod’s approachable, wise, and witty poems for decades, so it’s a real treat to have so many of them collected in one book. All Vows deserves a wide and appreciative readership.”

Art facing 1st Poem

All Vows, with topics from backseat driving to xenophobia, autograph collecting to valentines, is not just an enjoyable read, it is teachable text for poetry, and to make that point, those ordering the book for classroom use can request a free copy of Lessons for All Vows: A Student & Teachers Poetry Guide. The book of new and selected poems has ample samples of a variety of styles, sonnets, haikus, tankas, and poems that serve as prompts for those who write poems of their own. William Stafford, whose own poems were renown for their simple artfulness, described Axelrod’s work as, “Poems to cherish and pass around … a prize to keep.”

 

Yuyutsu Sharma: On the Last Leg of his Current Tour

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Yuyutsu Sharma is South Asia’s leading poet published by Nirala with growing International acclaim. He is currently in New York City as a visiting poet at Columbia University and had several readings in New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Florida and California. He has just returned from Argentina where he had gone to participate in XI International Poetry Festival, Buenos Aires. Half the year, he travels and reads all over the world to read from his works and conducts creative writing workshop at various universities in North America and Europe but goes trekking in the Himalayas when back home.
Here is a list of some of his upcoming readings in New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania.
(Only Public readings are listed)

Quake

New York

Friday, July 8, 2016 at 7:00pm

Yuyutsu Sharma Reading with Ruth Danon and David Austell to read at Open Center New York to benefit victims of the Nepal Earthquake at New York Open Center
22 East 30th Street, New York, NY 10016 Phone (212) 219-2527
http://www.opencenter.org/

 

Pennsylvania and Ohio

Sunday, July 10, 2016, 6;30
Sunday Special with Yuyutsu Sharma  and David Austell  at Poets’ Hall- 16 W 10th Meeting Room 210, Erie, Pennsylvania 16507 Hosted by Cee Williams

Bliaard frontMonday July 11, 2016, 7 pm,

Yuyutsu Sharma to read with David Austell at Barberton Gallery of Fine Art
33 3rd St SE, # 103 Barberton, Akron, Ohio, (330) 328-7619, admission free, donations encouraged. Hosted by Thomas Jenney

Wednesday July 13, 2016, 7.00 to 9.00 pm
Yuyutsu Sharma with Elizabeth Onusko and David Austell at Mac’s Backs– Books on the Coventry, 1820 Coventry Rd, Cleveland Heights, OH 44118 Phone: (216) 321-2665
http://www.macsbacks.com/
Mini

Yuyutsu Sharma, Ruth Danon and David Austell to read at Open Center New York

Friday, July 8, 2016, 7pm

Versions of Quest: Yuyutsu Sharma, Ruth Danon &  David Austel 

 reading to benefit victims of the Nepal Earthquake at New York Open Center 

22 East 30th Street, New York, NY 10016 Phone (212) 219-2527  

http://www.opencenter.org/

Himalayan Poet Yuyutsu Sharma will read his fresh poetry from his new book, Quaking Cantos Nepal Earthquake Poems along with American poets, David Austell and Ruth Danon.

 Austell will read from his new book, Garuda focused on the Hindu deity.  Danon will read from her just published book, Limitless Tiny Boats.

 The poets will pay tribute to the people of Nepal and read poetry to celebrate the people’s resilience and faith in life on this earth suffering from limitless human greed and senseless globalization.

2015.4.30.Poetry.Night-11 (2)Associate Provost and Director of the International Students and Scholars Office at Columbia University in New York City, David Austell is the author of Little Creek and Other Poems, containing the best of his work written over a decade, David often depicts memories of his childhood in the small American town where he was raised against the backdrop of the U.S. war in Vietnam and the Cold War Era. Currently, David is working on his third book, The Tin Man, focusing on the life of Saint Joseph of Arimathea. David is also fascinated by the planet Mars. He nevertheless makes his home in Harlem which is a very, very long way from the Tharsis Plain.

Ruth++5Ruth Danon is the author of the poetry collections, Limitless Tiny Boat, (BlazeVOX, October 17, 2015)  Living with the Fireman (Ziesing Brothers, 1981), and Triangulation from a Known Point (North Star Line, 1990), and a book of literary criticism, Work in the English Novel (Croom-Helm, 1985). New work is forthcoming i The Florida Review. Her poetry was selected by Robert Creeley for Best American Poetry, 2002, and her poetry and prose have appeared in NOON: The Journal of the Small Poem,VersalMead, BOMB, the Paris ReviewFence, the Boston Review3rd BedCrayon, and many other publications in the U.S. and abroad. She is a professor of creative and expository writing in the School of Professional Studies of New York University and founding Director of the SPS Summer Intensive Creative Writing Workshops.

Picture 074Recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature, Yuyutsu RD Sharma is a distinguished Himalayan poet, journalist and translator. He has published nine poetry collections including, Quaking Cantos: Nepal Earthquake Poems, A Blizzard in My Bones: New York Poems, Milarepa’s Bones, 33 New PoemsNepal Trilogy, a 900-page book with renowned German photographer, Andreas Stimm, Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America and Annapurna Poems, Selected & New Poems.  Widely traveled author, Yuyu has read his works at several prestigious places and held workshop in creative writing and translation at Queen’s University, Belfast, University of Ottawa and South Asian Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany, University of California, Davis, Sacramento State University, California and New York University, New York. Yuyutsu’s own work has been translated into German, French, Italian, Slovenian, Hebrew, Spanish and Dutch. He edits Pratik, A Magazine of Contemporary Writing and contributes literary columns to Nepal’s leading daily, The Himalayan Times. He was at the Poetry Parnassus Festival organized to celebrate London Olympics 2012 where he represented Nepal and India. Currently, Yuyutsu is in New York as a Visiting Poet at Columbia University. Half the year, he travels and reads all over the world to read from his works and conducts creative writing workshop at various universities in North America and Europe but goes trekking in the Himalayas when back home

 

Yuyutsu Sharma reading in San Francisco

You are warmly & joyfully invited to a POETRY READING at the Pink Palace…

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YUYUTSU SHARMA

Author of Quaking Cantos: Nepal Earthquake Poems

A Blizzard in My Bones:  New York Poems

The Nepal Trilogy:  Photographs and Poetry

about the Nepal areas of Annapurna, Everest, Helambu & Langtang

 

Wednesday, June 29, 2016 – 7:00 PM

at the Pink Palace,home of Diane Frank and Erik Ievins

in the Outer Sunset, San Francisco.

Please RSVP to GeishaPoet@aol.com to reserve your seat! 

I will mail the address and directions after your RSVP.

Dessert & snack potluck at the break – bring something sweet or savory or a beverage.

(Parking on neighborhood streets – same street or around the corner.)

PLEASE NOTE:  We observe the Japanese custom of no shoes in the house.

Shoe racks are provided on the porch.

PLEASE ALSO NOTE:  This is a fragrance-free event.

Please avoid scented skin & hair products & aftershave

so people with allergies and asthma can attend.

Please tell your friends and bring your friends!

 

The Fine Print…

 

Quaking Cantos is the creative response of a world-renowned Himalayan poet to the earthquakes that shook Nepal in 2015, killing thousands and leaving more than a million people homeless, vulnerable to the ravages of the harsh Himalayan environment. In the aftermath of the earthquakes, his North and Central American reading tours suspended, Yuyutsu returns to Nepal to bear witness to the devastation the “cosmic commotion” has caused in his own Himalayan home. “These are wonderful, troubling, and moving poems.”